In The News: Asthma

Can’t Catch Your Breath During Your Workout?

Did you know that over 25 million Americans suffer from asthma, 17+ million are adults and 6+ million are children? If you suffer from asthma, it is likely that you might experience symptoms when you exercise, known as Exercise Induced Bronchospasm (EIB). Additionally, there are some who cough, wheeze or get excessively short of breath only when they exercise. These individuals have what is termed Exercise Induced Asthma (EIA); many are elite athletes whose frequent training or overtraining can cause damage to the lungs.  Researching this condition might confuse you and honestly, it’s just semantics when you break it down between EIB and EIA. For all intents and purposes, we’ll refer to this condition as EIB.    

Read More

Asthma: Have You Been Misdiagnosed?

A new study indicates as many as one in three individuals with a current diagnosis of asthma may have been misdiagnosed. This apparently is not uncommon when proper testing is not obtained with initial diagnosis. This study emphasis that diagnosis and long term management of asthma requires objective measurements of lung function and that without pulmonary function data in long term asthma management, misdiagnosis can often occur. We routinely perform breathing tests at Charleston Allergy & Asthma including spirometry, impulse oscillometry and methacholine inhalation challenge.

Read More

Asthma, Illness and School: When to Stay Home

“Mom, I don’t feel good.”

“Dad, I have a sore throat.”

You hear these words just as your child is waking up to get ready for school.  You think, “Oh no, do I keep them home, do they need to go to the doctor, or are they not really sick at all?”  For parents of kids with asthma this can be a difficult decision, as asthma flares are often triggered by respiratory illnesses.  A child with asthma not only has to battle cold symptoms but also manage the additional asthma symptoms of cough, shortness of breath, and wheezing.

Read More

Back to School: Allergy and Asthma Tips for a Great Year!

1. Spring symptoms are all gone, but they’ll be back

If your child suffered from allergy symptoms in the spring, but has improved over the summer, then the fall might be the perfect time for your child to see a board-certified allergist.  Patients who suffer from mainly tree and grass pollen allergies should consider FDA-approved subcutaneous immunotherapy (allergy shots).  Studies have shown that immunotherapy is very beneficial in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis once patients reach maintenance dosing.  Therefore, starting immunotherapy in the fall gives patient the opportunity to reach maintenance dosing before spring. Also, FDA-approved sublingual (oral) tablets from grass should be started three months before grass season so testing for grass allergy should be performed prior to grass season starting.months before grass season so testing for grass allergy should be performed prior to grass season starting.

Read More