In The News: Winter Allergies

When are allergy tests needed?

If you have allergies, you likely know it. Sneezing, sniffling, itchy and watery eyes, the symptoms are sometimes overwhelming. Your immune system controls how your body defends itself and it overreacts to allergens you’ve inhaled, touched or ate. For example, if you’re allergic to dogs, your immune system identifies dog hair or dander as an invader. Your immune system produces antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (or IgE). These antibodies travel to cells that release chemicals, causing an allergic reaction. These reactions can range from annoying sniffles to a life-threatening response called anaphylaxis.  

If you’re experiencing symptoms, but aren’t sure why or what’s causing them, allergy testing may be needed. Symptoms that usually prompt testing include:

  • Respiratory – itchy eyes, nose or throat; nasal congestion, runny nose, watery eyes, chest congestion, cough or wheezing
  • Skin – itchiness or eczema  
  • Abdominal – vomiting or cramping and diarrhea consistently after eating certain foods
  • Severe reactions to stinging insect stings (other than swelling at the site of the sting)
  • Anaphylaxis (pronounced an-a-fi-LAK-sis): a serious allergic reaction that affects many parts of the body at the same time

Allergy tests are the best and safest way to tell exactly what triggers your symptoms. The most common triggers include dust mites, animal dander, mold, pollen, insects, foods, latex and drugs. An allergist/immunologist can perform multiple types of allergy tests.

 

  • Skin tests: This is the most common kind of testing done in the allergist’s office. In this test, a small amount of allergenic liquid is placed on your skin and this area is pricked or scratched. Redness and swelling at a testing site tells us you are allergic to the tested allergen. It is generally not much more bothersome than a bug bite. The results of this test are ready in minutes, so you leave the office knowing what you are allergic to.
  • Intradermal tests: Intradermal tests are more sensitive than prick tests and may be used when prick test results are inconclusive. In this test, a very small amount of the sterile testing liquid will be injected just under the surface of your skin, similar to a TB test. The results are available in minutes.
  • Challenge tests: Challenge tests are sometimes used when a doctor suspects you have a food or drug allergy. In this test, a patient will eat or inhale a very small amount of the possible allergen under the close supervision of a board-certified allergist. The amount is gradually increased over several hours to ensure a full serving or dose can be tolerated. This type of test should only be done by a board-certified allergist with experience treating anaphylaxis. For your safety, do not try this test at home!
  • Blood tests: For this test, blood is drawn and then tested for allergies. This test is more expensive than skin testing and it takes longer to receive your results. Interpretation of this test should be done by a board-certified allergist as a positive result does not necessarily mean the patient is allergic. It is best understood in conjunction with an extensive allergy history and skin test. Unlike skin testing, blood allergy testing can be done when patients are still on oral antihistamines.

 

Many people with untreated symptoms aren’t aware of how much better they will feel once they are properly diagnosed and their symptoms are managed. We are here to help you breathe better, feel better and live better!

Give us a call or request an appointment online to begin your allergy treatment plan with one of our amazing board-certified doctors!

Read More

Is it allergies or a cold?

Are you sniffling, sneezing, wheezing and coughing? You may be wondering if you have a common cold or suffering from allergies. The problem is, it’s not always easy to tell the two apart. The symptoms can be the same, but the treatments, not so much. So let’s take a look at each, see how they differ, and how to treat them.

The Common Cold

A cold is an infection caused by a virus, usually in the upper respiratory tract affecting the nose, throat and/or sinuses. Symptoms may appear less than two days after exposure and include coughing, sore throat, runny nose, sneezing, headache, and possible fever. A cold will usually develop over several days and takes a couple days to clear up.

While there is no vaccine or cure for the cold, there are ways to help prevent it, the most common being hand washing. While antibiotics will not help with a cold, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen can help with discomfort. You also need to stay hydrated and rested. 

Allergies

Allergies are your immune system’s reaction to things like pollen, grass, pet dander and foods like peanuts. An allergic reaction usually triggers symptoms in the nose, lungs, throat, sinuses, ears, and on the skin. In the most serious cases, a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis can occur.

Because allergies and colds have similar symptoms, like sniffles and stuffiness, many people get them confused. But, there are additional symptoms with allergies like red eyes, an itchy rash, shortness of breath, or swelling. But unlike a cold, which develops over time, allergies begin shortly after you’re exposed to what you’re allergic to. When it comes to the duration, allergies will last as long as you’re exposed. More than likely, if you’ve been experiencing symptoms for more than two weeks, it’s allergies.

So, what if you don’t know what you’re allergic to, but you have symptoms? How can you tell a common cold from allergies? Take a look at the list below and decide how many of the symptoms you have. 

    • Clear or watery mucus
    • Itchy skin or watery eyes
    • Unchanging symptoms 
    • Sniffles for more than a week
    • Symptoms only during certain situations

If you’ve been experiencing symptoms like these, all hope is not lost. There are multiple kinds of allergies, and treatments vary for each. Treatments include avoidance, medications and allergy injections. 

If you want relief from your allergies, or to find out what you’re allergic to, schedule an appointment with a board-certified allergist.

Sources:

https://www.aaaai.org/Aaaai/media/MediaLibrary/PDF%20Documents/Libraries/EL-allergies-colds-allergies-sinusitis-patient.pdf

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/allergies

Read More

What are inhalers & how do they work?

Bronchodilators, or most commonly called inhalers, are medications that are breathed through the mouth and into the lungs to help relax muscles that tighten around your airways. The medicine helps open the airway and lets more air move in and out of your lungs and helps you breathe more easily. 

People with asthma use inhalers during an attack when their airways swell and become narrower. These attacks cause the person to cough, wheeze and have trouble breathing. Almost everyone with asthma will use a bronchodilator to help open their airways. Others may use one at some point in their life if diagnosed with a persistent cough, COPD, bronchitis, etc. Different inhalers have different medications, or a combination of drugs, to address different illnesses. 

Different Kinds of Inhalers

There are three basic types of inhalers that deliver medications. The most common is the metered-dose inhaler (or MDI) which uses pressure to push the medication out of the inhaler. Nebulizers use air or oxygen and deliver a mist of the medication through a tube or mask that fits over your nose and mouth. Dry powder inhalers (or DPIs) deliver medication, but they require a strong and fast inhalation.

Short-acting bronchodilators are used as “quick-relief”, “reliever”, or “rescue” inhalers. These bronchodilators open the airways and help stop or relieve acute asthma attacks very quickly. While they’re best known for working on sudden attacks, they’re also great to use before exercise to help stop asthma during your workout. 

While many people use short-acting bronchodilators, the overuse of an inhaler, tablet, or liquid/nebulizer, is a sign of uncontrolled asthma that needs better treatment. If you are using short-acting bronchodilators more than twice a week, call Charleston Allergy & Asthma about improving your asthma control therapy.

Long-acting bronchodilators provide control, not quick relief, of asthma. Your board-certified allergist will prescribe the medication, which is usually taken twice a day along with inhaled steroids for long-term monitoring of symptoms. 

Unlike short-acting inhalers, long-acting inhalers do not work on muscle inflammation directly. Instead, they help the airways relax, allowing more air to pass through.

If you’re struggling with your asthma or think you may be in need of a prescribed inhaler, request an appointment online today.

 

Sources:

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-dictionary/asthma-inhalers

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-dictionary/bronchodialator

Read More

The Flu Vaccine: More Important Than Ever

Like clockwork, we hear the warnings every year. When flu season rolls around, everyone is encouraged to get the vaccine to prevent the spread of influenza. There are many reasons why getting the flu vaccine is beneficial and highly recommended. What are some of those reasons and, more importantly, why is it more vital than ever that you get your flu shot during the COVID-19 pandemic?

The Usual Benefits of the Flu Vaccine  

The most obvious benefit of flu vaccination is that it can keep you from coming down with the flu. While 100% protection is not guaranteed, getting vaccinated does make a difference

In fact, during 2018-2019, it was estimated to have prevented more than 4 million flu illnesses, more than 2 million flu-related medical visits, tens of thousands of hospital visits and 40,000-60,000 deaths. It may have even been you who was spared from the flu and its potential complications as a result of vaccination (on your part or that of others)! 

What other compelling reasons are there to get your flu shot yearly? Besides reducing your risk of getting sick and reducing hospitalizations, the vaccine has been shown to:

  • Prevent and limit the severity of influenza illnesses in people with chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk for complications
  • Protect women during and after pregnancy, as well as protecting their newborn child(ren)
  • Reduce the severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get the flu anyway. Since every flu season and every individual’s response to influenza are different, you’ll want to have the most protection possible against things going south

Don’t forget that, even if you’re not pregnant or dealing with chronic illness, your flu shot can protect others around you who are. This is especially true during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How Flu Shots Can Save Lives During COVID-19 

Experts have predicted that the viruses responsible for the flu and COVID-19 will be co-circulating this fall and winter. This has the potential to cause several problems. 

  1. It could perpetuate the spread of COVID through individuals who mistake symptoms as mild flu and do not adhere to the recommended guidelines for the sick
  2. Contracting the flu and coronavirus at the same time comes with an increased risk of serious and even life-threatening illness
  3. Severe but preventable cases of the flu requiring hospitalization take away the staff and resources needed to treat COVID-19 patients

Protect Yourself, Protect Others 

As you can see, the flu vaccination is more important than ever before. While in 2018-2019, less than half of all Americans got the flu shot, we hope that many more will do their part to protect themselves and others this year, especially since the stakes have been raised by the pandemic. 

With fall already upon us and flu season looming, now is the time to get your flu shot. Since the vaccine takes about two weeks to trigger the creation of antibodies, the sooner, the better! 

 

Read More