Allergy and Immunology: A Misunderstood Medical Field

Ever wonder why there is a specialized medical field just for allergy? How about those old tales you’ve heard of classic allergy symptoms only to realize they were caused by something else? Believe it or not, there are plenty of misconceptions about allergy and asthma, which is why our team is dedicated to educating our patients on their condition and treatment every step of the way. Dr. Lindsey S. Steadman took the time to share about her experience becoming a board-certified allergist and how our team’s training equips us to give our clients the very best allergy and asthma care.

 

How does an allergist become an allergist?

In order to become an allergist, we go through many years of medical school and clinical training:

  • 4-year undergraduate degree – Most healthcare providers choose a major that they feel best prepares them for medical school, such as biology, chemistry, biochemistry, etc.
  • 4-year medical school degree – Medical school provides the basis of education in becoming a doctor, covering a wide variety of medical care and topics to ensure a well-rounded education.
  • 3-year residency program – All physicians must enter a residency program of some kind to complete their specialty training. As allergists and immunologists, we all have to receive training in either pediatrics or internal medicine. These are both 3-year residency programs, and they are each followed by a board exam that must be passed in order to become a certified pediatrician or internist.
  • 2 to 3-year fellowship – Residents interested in specializing further can then apply to various fellowship programs. The majority of allergy and immunology fellowship programs are two years long (occasionally three years long). Once we graduate from fellowship, we must pass a board exam in order to be certified in allergy and immunology.

After passing our boards, we are able to treat patients of all ages with any sort of allergic or immunologic disease. This includes, but is not limited to, environmental/seasonal allergies, food allergies, stinging insect allergies, anaphylaxis, hives and swelling, eczema, asthma, chronic/recurrent infections and immunodeficiencies.

 

Why is allergy and immunology such a misunderstood field?

Allergy and immunology is a poorly understood field not only in the general population, but also within the medical community. There are many different myths and “old wives’ tales” out there about allergy signs, symptoms and treatments amongst the general population. When patients are not properly educated by allergy experts, these myths and misinformation continue to circulate and become accepted as fact. Even in the medical field, allergy is a misunderstood because there is very little, if any, dedicated teaching or training on allergy and immunology in medical school or residency programs. Fellowship is where the true allergy and immunology training occurs, so a board-certified allergist is always recommended for patients suffering from any sort of allergic disease or immune deficiency.

We are trained on how to obtain a detailed history to determine whether or not testing and further work-up is needed. We are taught how to interpret the results of both skin and blood tests for various types of allergies, lung function testing for asthma, and blood work for immune disorders, all of which are oftentimes not very straightforward. We are also taught how to appropriately manage these issues with medications, allergy shots, biologics, immunoglobulin replacement, oral food/drug challenges and oral immunotherapy for select food allergies. Therefore, it is always recommended to seek the help of a board-certified allergist because we are the experts in the disease process, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management and treatment of all allergic and immunologic diseases.

 

What are some common myths about allergy and immunology?

  • Every sniffle or sneeze is an allergy and every cough or episode of shortness of breath is asthma… FALSE. Fortunately, we are trained to determine whether or not patients have allergies and/or asthma. Not only can we diagnose and treat these issues, but if patients’ allergy- or asthma-like symptoms are caused by something else, we can often help with those problems as well.
  • Every hive or episode of swelling is due to an allergic reaction… FALSE. This can be true at times, but there are also instances when hives are caused by other things as well. We are trained on how to determine whether or not there is an allergy-causing patients’ hives and swelling and how to treat them no matter the cause.
  • All allergic reactions get worse with subsequent exposures… FALSE. There is no way to predict the severity of an allergic reaction based on previous reactions or testing methods. However, we can help diagnose the cause of the allergic reaction (foods, insect stings, medications, etc.) and educate patients on what exposures would be unsafe and how to handle reactions in the future.

 

If you believe you’ve been experiencing allergy or asthma symptoms but you’re unsure of what to do next, leave it to the experts! All of our allergists are board-certified and our team is dedicated to helping you breathe better, feel better and live better. Schedule your appointment with the experts today.