In The News: Charleston Allergy

Meet the Girls: Our Charleston Allergy Trio!

Let’s hear it for the girls! Our Charleston Allergy & Asthma team has been blessed with some fantastic board-certified providers who all go above and beyond in giving exceptional care for our patients. For more than 30 years, we’ve been providing relief from allergies and asthma to the people of the Lowcountry.

To celebrate the incredible women in our lives, we’re thrilled to introduce you to our three female providers and share their stories of how they came to lead the way for women in healthcare. Get to know our favorite female allergists below!

Dr. Meredith Moore
Did you want to be a doctor when you were a little girl?
“Yes, I had to have a surgery when I was young and afterward, had to stay in a big ward with no parents. A burn victim was next to me and they would change her dressings. She was so sad and would cry. One night, she was crying and hysterical. All the physicians and nurses had left her, no parents were there and I went over and sat with her and made her feel better. I knew that I wanted people to have a better experience.”

What is your favorite part about being a doctor?
“Hard to answer because there are so many things! It’s the relationships you develop with people. They have allowed you the privilege of sharing their lives with you. It’s an awesome privilege and an amazing experience that someone was able to open themselves up to you and then you help make their lives better.”

What’s it like to balance personal and work life as a doctor?
“Practicing medicine with passion takes a lot out of you, whether you are a man or a woman, mom or not. Universally, it’s difficult if you want to approach medicine as a calling. It’s a very rewarding but demanding profession, no matter who you are.”

Dr. Carolyn Word
Why did you become a doctor?
“Growing up, my grandfather was a general practitioner and when we visited him in his office, I loved seeing how he interacted with patients and how he was able to help them. It seemed like a great way to help people. I always loved math and science, so I did biomedical engineering for undergrad. In the process of that, I realized that though I loved science, I loved working with people more. It’s a great way for me to take my love of science and apply it to patient care, which led me to medicine. I loved my rotation in allergy/immunology and all the ways we can make a difference in our patients’ lives.”

Have you overcome any obstacles as a female in the medical field?
“I think there certainly are stereotypes about women in medicine. There have been times when patients have thought I was a nurse because I was a woman or question my knowledge but more often, they have been grateful. When I was a medical student, I felt more pressure as a woman to work harder, push harder and prove myself to be accepted. I have never felt like that in my practice now and I’m grateful to work in such a wonderful practice.”

What’s your favorite part about your job?
“When I get to see a patient for a follow-up and hear that they are feeling so much better. When a patient has recently started allergy shots and has been coming in for frequent injections for a couple of months, then they share that after years of medicine, they had no idea how they could feel so much better; that’s the best part! Patients who have been struggling with a food allergy and who have passed their food challenge, then seeing their excitement. It’s a great thing to be a part of. And just getting to know my patients in general. We catch up about their lives beyond helping them find relief. We’re building relationships. It’s personal.”

Dr. Lindsey Stoltz Steadman
Why did you want to become a doctor?
“I was always interested in the sciences: biology, anatomy, physiology. On top of that, I enjoy interacting with people and going into a profession that was going to allow me to give back was important to me. I really enjoy teaching. I believe as a physician, my job is to educate our patients, our patients’ families and the community about our field.”

What’s it like to balance personal and work-life in the medical industry?
“My husband is a physician as well, so a major part of our relationship is that we’re very understanding of what the other person is going through. We bounce ideas off of each other and educate each other. There are a lot of sacrifices made when you decide you want to be a doctor and it doesn’t end after graduation of medical school, fellowship, etc. We understand that about each other. I understand when he needs to do a surgery in the middle of the night and he understands when I have to take a call over the weekend. Our training kept us a part in different cities and different states, but we understood what the other person was going through. We may have been a part, but we were together.”

What do you love most about your job?
“Critical thinking. I really enjoy the process of meeting a patient and getting to put the pieces of the puzzle together to help them. I’m grateful that I get to improve people’s quality of life. Nothing is more rewarding than hearing their success stories.”

Is there anything you want to add about being a doctor?
“You can know all the science but if you can’t explain it to your patient then it all goes out of the window. Rapport with your patients is equally as important as understanding the science. Patients need to feel comfortable with their doctor. At the end of the day, you just need to be good at what you do.”

We’re thankful for the incredible team of compassionate and talented providers that we have here at Charleston Allergy & Asthma! If you think you may be suffering from allergy symptoms or if you’re in need of a local board-certified allergist, schedule an appointment with our team today.

 

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How COVID-19 Has Impacted Pediatric Wellness Visits

Our whole world has been turned upside down. One year ago, you were enjoying social activities, going to the beach, watching and participating in competitive sports, and visiting your physician if you had a medical problem. Since the beginning of this year, however, we have experienced a global pandemic with a coronavirus that has rapidly spread throughout the world. This phenomenon was fairly unknown to current generations, as the most recent pandemic of this nature occurred with the Spanish flu over 100 years ago. To date, the world has experienced tens of thousands of deaths and crippling, long lasting disease, overflowing hospitals, overwhelming fear and the addition of new terms to our vocabulary such as “social distancing” and “flatten the curve.”

With the onslaught of this international pandemic and no available adequate medical therapy, we have been forced to isolate ourselves and our families until a protective vaccine is developed. There is currently an international race to acquire this vaccine, however, vaccines require intensive safety and efficacy testing on thousands of people. It is likely that a vaccine for COVID-19 will not be available until the end of this calendar year.

One of the unintended consequences of this isolation due to the COVID-19 virus has been the disruption of routine childhood vaccinations. The decrease of administered vaccines is on a scale that hasn’t been  seen since widespread immunization programs began in the 1970s. Vaccine disruption has been caused by several circumstances. Parents are no longer taking children to clinics because of movement restrictions imposed by spread of the coronavirus or fear of risk of exposure to this virus. Health workers who provide vaccinations have also been diverted to help with response to the pandemic. This disruption has caused some 80 million children around the world to be at higher risk for preventable infectious diseases such as diphtheria, whooping cough, measles and polio.

According to the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the Sabin Vaccine Institute, childhood vaccine programs have been disrupted in at least 68 countries due to the COVID pandemic. With the expected continuation of the pandemic, this immense vaccination program is now under threat, risking the resurgence of previously controlled infectious diseases.

A CDC morbidity and mortality weekly report issued in May 2020 examined the pandemic’s effect on childhood vaccines. This report documented substantial decreases in the number of vaccines ordered and administered to children since the United States declared an international emergency in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020.

Routine childhood immunizations remain a vital component of pediatric healthcare, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. Children’s immune systems are still developing from passive immunity acquired through the mother’s placenta in utero. Vaccinations help produce antibodies (active immunity) in those who receive them, allowing the immune system to recognize viruses or bacteria and fight off these diseases or limit the severity of complications if exposed to the actual disease. Immunizations also protect public health through herd immunity, preventing widespread outbreak of highly infectious diseases, particularly measles and whooping cough. Individuals who have not been vaccinated and contract these infectious diseases could spread it to susceptible individuals for up to a week before developing any personal symptoms. Some childhood vaccines that were once believed to lead to lifelong immunity have actually been found to decrease in effectiveness during patients’ late teenage years, particularly for pertussis (whooping cough). Recently, recommendations for adult immunizations have changed to include boosters for diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and measles. The likelihood of catastrophic spread of common infectious diseases, such as whooping cough, drastically increases if a large portion of the adult population is able to contract the virus without realizing it.

The CDC continues to encourage childhood immunizations during the COVID-19 crisis, with recent recommendations for healthcare providers to continue with patient visits during this pandemic. For parents who choose not to immunize their children during the pandemic, there are “catch-up” schedules provided by the CDC so the children won’t need to start over or repeat doses that have already been received. Many childcare centers are also allowing a grace period for childhood immunizations at this time. In order to help reduce the spread of these viruses, the CDC recommends social distancing and separating sick children from well children.

As of yet, there have been no reports of localized outbreaks of common pediatric infectious diseases such as measles, whooping cough or polio. However, these diseases are still present in the community and if immunization levels drop and herd immunity slips below 70%, the potential for outbreaks both internationally and in the U.S. increase. Our team currently urges patients to please make every attempt to maintain routine childhood immunizations for your children during this pandemic. We are also hopeful for a rapid and effective COVID-19 vaccine!

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Little girl in class wearing a mask. How COVID is making back to school look.

Back to School: COVID-19 and Asthma

Many families are faced with the unusual question of “Should I send my child back to school this fall?” COVID-19 has changed a lot about our lives, and it will affect how our children learn, too. For parents of a child with asthma, this can be a particularly difficult decision and many families are divided on how to proceed. The information presented here is based on our current understanding of COVID-19 to help families make informed decisions. Ultimately, the family will need to decide whether it is in their child’s best interest to return to in-person learning.

The risk of being exposed to COVID-19 is statistically higher when attending school in person; however, the individual clinical implications of COVID-19 are still largely unknown due to our limited and rapidly changing knowledge after limited experience with this new virus.  Early in the pandemic, the CDC identified asthma as a risk factor for severe COVID-19 illness.  Subsequent studies have not supported this, and the CDC guidance has changed to state that asthma may be a risk factor for severe COVID-19 illness. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology COVID-19 Response Task Force has stated, “…there are no data suggesting that asthma is a risk factor for becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2; and there are no data to suggest that, if infected, asthma patients have a more severe course of COVID-19 disease. Further, there are no data that suggest SARS-CoV-2 exacerbates asthma. As such, the task force members do not see a reason that asthma would be a reason to avoid school. ” 

In-person learning plays a critical role in childhood development with opportunities for hands-on education, consistent supervision, structure which is crucial for learning task & time management, and social and psychological support. Your family will have the best understanding of the social and educational risks to your child with continued social isolation.

Here are some things to consider:

  • Your child’s overall health.
  • Your family’s health – is someone in your household at high risk of severe COVID illness?
  • The community transmission rate – higher rates mean higher risks of infection.
  • Family work demands – is there someone who can supervise children at home in a healthy and engaging environment? Can the household support possible loss of income?
  • Your child’s academic needs. Does your child need the structure of the classroom and teachers for success? Does your child receive special services that require in-person learning?
  • Schedule uncertainty – if your child’s class or school is quarantined will your family be able to adjust to the changing schedule? How will your child adjust to a changing schedule?

For families who decide their children will return to in-person learning, then it is imperative to ensure all  CDC and AAP recommended social distancing measures are followed. Additionally, the CDC recommends remote learning when community transmission is substantial, as is currently the situation this August in Charleston. In-person learning during times of substantial community transmission would be expected to increase the likelihood of exposure to COVID-19.

Based on what we currently understand, well-controlled asthma does not appear to significantly increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness. Your family will need to balance the physical risks, educational risks, and family impacts of returning to school versus virtual learning to determine the best course of action for your situation.  With either decision, it is always important to follow CDC COVID-19 social distancing guidelines.

 

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Uploaded ToAllergy Friendly Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Allergy-Friendly Chocolate Chunk Cookies

The kids have been out of school for a while now. Many of you may be working from home as well. Are you running out of stay-at-home activities?

When done the right way, cooking with kids can give them something to do and teach them important life skills while having a good time!

We tried this amazing recipe for “Big Chocolate Chunk Cookies” we found in “Allergic Living Magazine”, and honestly… they’re so delicious… we had to roll through the house because we ate so many of them! This recipe is a great opportunity to get into the kitchen with your kids and have a bit of fun!

Ingredients:

2 cups all-purpose flour (or gluten-free variation)

2 tsp baking powder

½ tsp baking soda

½ tsp cream of tartar

½ tsp salt

1 cup allergy-friendly chocolate chunks

½ cup canola, grapeseed or rice bran oil

½ cup maple syrup

4 tsp vanilla extract

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.
    • Note: When we tried this recipe, we didn’t use parchment paper and the cookies crisped quickly.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt. Stir in chocolate chunks.
  3. Put brown sugar, oil, maple syrup and vanilla in a medium mixing bowl. Beat with a hand mixer until emulsified, about 1 minute.
  4. Stir flour mixture into a wet mixture until fully combined. The dough may be a little greasy.
  5. Shape dough into 1 ½ balls and place 2 inches apart on baking sheets. Lightly flatten the dough and press in any loose chocolate chunks. This recipe should make 24 cookies.
    • Note: The warmer the dough got, the harder it was to mold. Mold what you can and put the rest in the refrigerator for about 5 minutes while you bake the cookies you were able to roll out. Do this process as many times as needed until all the dough is used.
  6. Bake for 8-12 minutes. It will be light in color.
  7. Let cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

Free of dairy, eggs, nuts, peanuts and soy.

Gluten-free oatmeal cookie variation: Using a spice grinder, process 1 cup certified gluten-free quick oats into flour. Substitute the oat flour, ½ c starch (corn, tapioca or arrowroot) and 1 ½ cups certified gluten-free quick oats for the all-purpose flour in the above recipe.

Wondering if you or someone you know has food allergies? Schedule an appointment with one of our board-certified allergists today.

 

 

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Dr. Carolyn with her dog Cider

Doctors and their Dogs

From their playful personalities and puppy-dog eyes to their joyful tail wags and the gift of putting a smile on faces young and small, it’s hard to deny that dogs truly are man’s (and woman’s) best friend! That certainly goes for our doctors here at Charleston Allergy & Asthma. We have a team full of dog-lovers, including some of our very own board-certified allergists!

We’ve rallied up all of the cute pup pictures, fun facts and some helpful tips on how you can still enjoy your favorite furry companion despite having pet allergies.

Gabriel

Gabriel, or “Gabe” for short, is the sweet Bracco Italiano of Dr. Thomas Harper. He’s been with the Harper family since his “gotcha day” on October 21, 2017. Though he may be a dog, Dr. Harper says, “he runs like a horse. Pounces like a cat. Will stand on hind legs and box you like a kangaroo.” He’s a 75-pound athlete and has mastered lots of tricks!

While the Harper family doesn’t have any pet allergies in their household, we asked Dr. Harper a few questions that our patients could benefit from:

What advice would you give someone who has pet allergies and wants to get a pet?

“When you are pet allergic, you are allergic to a protein that’s in the hair, saliva, dander, etc. There is no such thing as a hypoallergenic pet. You can get pets that shed less, but they are still allergenic. If you want to get a pet, you can keep the pet outdoors, vacuum a lot, or invest in a HEPA filter.”

What about cats?

“Cats have a lot of allergen in their saliva and they groom their fur (which dogs don’t) so then allergen aerosolizes off their hair from grooming. If it’s an outdoor cat and the saliva aerosolizes, it’s no big deal. However, if the cat is in the house or an enclosed space, then the saliva aerosolizes and doesn’t go anywhere and the concentration increases.”

What is your top recommendation for treating pet allergies?

“You can also choose to be desensitized to the animals. Immunotherapy for pet allergies is incredibly successful. I have cared for three veterinarians that have been allergic to cats and dogs. Can you imagine? And they were all cured through immunotherapy.”

Boss

This handsome Boston terrier mix has belonged to Dr. Lindsey Stoltz Steadman for seven years. Full of energy with no pause button to be found, Boss is quite the handful and has plenty of nicknames including “Bossy,” “Bossydoodle” and even “Boo Bear!” You also might be impressed to hear that Boss can clear a 4.5” fence; he’s “like a gazelle.” Dr. Stoltz Steadman also had a pet growing up, a Yorkie named Spanky, who lived to be 17 years old!

When asked about pet allergies, Dr. Stoltz Steadman shared that she is mildly allergic to dogs but is able to control her symptoms with medicine and has likely built up a small tolerance to her allergies from Boss.  We asked her to give us a few tips for pet-lovers who struggle with allergies:

What advice do you have for someone with pet allergies longing for a pet?

“Expose yourself to different breeds, seek an animal out that sheds less. Keep them out of your bedroom, that will give you a short break from the allergens. I would definitely recommend getting started on an immunotherapy treatment prior to getting an animal so your symptoms will be better controlled. These treatments help alleviate your symptoms and often lead to complete relief from pet allergies in many of our patients.”

Indiana

This fluffy pup, known as Indiana or “Indy” belongs to Dr. Meredith Moore. He’s been with the family since December 2013! As a labradoodle, Indy is boisterous and energetic but he’s never met a person or animal that he didn’t fall in love with…except for a cat, that is.

Dr. Moore also shared how her family has dealt with pet allergies in their home:

Are you, or is anyone in your home, allergic to dogs? If so, what do you do?

“Yes, my oldest son is allergic to dogs. We had another dog that was a rescue and had her when Finn was growing up but we were moving so much when I was in the military that the dog went to live with grandparents. During this time, Finn developed his allergies to pets and we were unaware. When we settled, we rescued another dog and Finn had a terrible time with sneezing and wheezing so we were unable to keep that dog.  The family was so sad. We started Finn on allergy shots to try to combat this. After he was on for three years, we entertained the idea of getting another dog. We spent time with a friend’s labradoodle and also went and met a breeder and Finn did fine without any symptoms. Even in a room of 15 dogs! So, that’s how Indy joined our family.

There is no data that supports the term ‘hypoallergenic’ in terms of animals. All animals release allergens via saliva, skin, and urine that can affect people. It’s not uncommon for me to take care of patients who say they can tolerate their own dog but are symptomatic around other people’s dogs. Anecdotally, people claim they develop a ‘tolerance’ to their own animal.”

What advice would you give someone who is allergic to pets?

“It would be beneficial to you to treat the allergy first. If people have an animal already, we want to do whatever we can to have the allergic person and the animal tolerate one another. There are lots of things we can do and immunotherapy (IT) is the most effective. You can modify the home environment, as well, by limiting the animal’s indoor roaming space, effective cleaning and air filters. If you do not have the pet yet, then it’s better to treat with allergy shots before you get an animal and get it home. It’s not uncommon for patients to have mild reactions to animals but once the animal is home, it can be up to six months before your symptoms become intolerable.”

Cider

Dr. Carolyn Word’s pup Cyder is a 6-year-old American field black lab, but don’t let her age fool you, she is still very much a puppy! Cider loves to play fetch and could care less about meeting new dog friends, she just loves to throw her ball around. Dr. Word also shared her love for pets when she was growing up. Her family always had labs as pets and even had some rabbits and a feral cat named Simba!

Dr. Word’s family has also experienced pet allergies:

Are you or is anyone in your home allergic to dogs?

“My husband was allergic but completed allergy shots and he no longer has symptoms. I still remember when we were dating in high school, I would sit and wait with him for 30 minutes after receiving his allergy shots. That’s how we got to know each other.”

What advice do you have for someone who has pet allergies but wants a dog?

“Come visit us! I’ve seen so many patients that have pets, developed symptoms, and we were able to help them gain relief with allergy shots. If a pet licking your face is what will make you happy, we’re here to make that happen for you!”

If you’re longing for a pet but believe you might be suffering from pet allergies, our team of board-certified allergists is here to help. No need to sacrifice your love of your furry friends! Consider getting tested for allergies so that our team can help you with the next steps to find relief. Request an appointment with our team today.

 

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Smiling woman using laptop.

Telehealth tips: How to get the most out of your telehealth visit

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and in an effort to practice social distancing, many patients are experiencing telehealth visits for the first time. Whether you’re meeting with our team of board-certified allergists or another medical provider, there are some simple and practical steps you can take to make the most out of your visit. 

As our providers have been serving patients via telehealth, we’ve compiled our list of the best tips and tricks so that your visit is smooth sailing and we can provide the best possible care – virtually!

Check your tech

Make sure you have a smartphone or computer with a front-facing camera that is positioned at eye-level. Check that your internet connection is strong prior to your visit and be sure that your camera and microphone is turned on at the start of your call. For the most reliable internet connection, use a wired connection when possible. And don’t forget to make sure your battery is fully charged or that a charger is closeby. 

Quiet is key

Find a private space where your provider will be able to hear you clearly. It can be difficult to hear or distracting when there is lots of background noise. Using headphones can make it easier to keep your conversation private and ensure you can always hear your provider throughout the call.

Bright light

If possible, set up in a well-lit space so that your provider can see you clearly. Try turning on overhead lights and blocking light from windows, which can lead to a bright glare. Try not to sit directly in front of windows, this could cause a “shadow” effect and make it difficult to see your face.

Question cues

Are there symptoms that you’ve been experiencing or particular questions that you know you want to address with your provider? Given that your appointment setting is different than normal, preparing ahead of time and writing those questions down ensures that you don’t forget anything you want to cover. Be ready to share information regarding your symptoms and any questions or concerns you might have.

Practice patience

If you’re new to using telehealth technology, don’t worry! If the call drops, simply follow the original instructions to jump back into the session. Technology can be finicky and unpredictable and our staff is taking that into consideration throughout telehealth appointments.

Telehealth has been an incredible asset during COVID-19. Our team is dedicated to providing you with the best appointment experience possible and we want to be sure you get the most out of it as well. Are you in need of an appointment? Visit our telehealth webpage today to sign up for your visit.

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Lady cleaning counters with facemask and gloves on.

Safe Spring Cleaning

Recently, we have all become part of a whole new world brought on by the COVID-19 virus. As we are isolated and quarantined to our homes to reduce exposure, we are finding ourselves cleaning…and cleaning out…and cleaning some more! A spring cleaning would seem like a great way to occupy our time and help our family’s underlying allergies and asthma; however, many of us have allergies and asthma, which can frequently be triggered by indoor household exposure. Not to worry, you can still give your space a good cleaning, just be careful with your choice of cleaning products. Our goal is to keep you safe and healthy!

Dr. Harper once had a patient who was hospitalized because they were cleaning floor tiles with diluted bleach. Unbeknownst to the patient, her supervisor had sprayed ammonia ahead of her cleaning efforts. The mixture of diluted bleach and ammonia produced chlorine gas, which was used as chemical warfare in WWI.

Certain household cleaning products that are readily available can trigger significant respiratory problems, even in individuals without prior lung disease. A recent study in the American Review of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine indicates that women who are employed as household cleaners have an accelerated loss of lung function, particularly if they are using spray cleaners.

Allergy sufferers should make household chores part of their allergy management plan. Cleaning reduces the number of allergens in homes which can ultimately help alleviate your allergy and asthma symptoms. Indoor allergen avoidance would include reducing dust-collecting clutter, regularly vacuuming with a HEPA filter vacuum, regularly washing blankets and throw rugs, washing all bed linens in hot water once a week, keeping counter surfaces clean and dry, and not leaving food out. 

Individuals who have asthma have increased airway twitchiness which can be triggered by irritant and noxious odors including cigarette smoke, chlorine, fragrances and ammonia. If one has asthma or allergies, care should be taken to choose cleaning products which are milder and do not trigger worsening of your symptoms. 

 Certain potent cleaning products can be mucosal irritants and can cause a worsening of respiratory symptoms in patients with allergies and asthma. The best way to avoid irritation from cleaning products is to have someone else in the household do the cleaning when the allergy sufferer is away from home. This could be a perfect time for your spouse to clean while you enjoy a walk!

There are particular home cleaning products which should be avoided by individuals with allergies and asthma. These products include formaldehyde, ammonia, sodium lauryl sulfate, D-limonene and sodium hypochlorite (bleach). Unfortunately, these chemicals can be found in a wide variety of available cleaning products including furniture polish, disinfectants, mold removers, dish detergents, hand soaps, laundry detergents, fabric softeners, all-purpose cleaners and drain/oven/grill cleaners. “Green” cleaning products can be milder and better for those with allergies, but labels should be read carefully. Interestingly, simple baking soda and vinegar in varying concentrations can clean just about anything in your home!

The best cleaning tools for allergen reduction include a vacuum cleaner, particularly with a double bag system or HEPA filter system. Additionally, a fabric allergen sanitizer vacuum can eliminate 99.9% of dust mites and bacteria from fabric surfaces. Washable microfiber cleaning cloths are safe and effective. Likewise, disposable dust wipes, protective mask and gloves and unscented and dye-free laundry products are safe and work well.

There are many, many cleaning products advertised on the internet, although the safety and effectiveness of these products can be questionable. How do you choose a safe cleaning product? The Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America (AAFA) has developed a certification program to document specific advertised products as being safe from false, exaggerated, or misleading claims. These products can be found on the AAFA website.    

If one is inclined to be a “do-it-yourselfer,” safe gentle homemade cleaners can be prepared without an advance chemical degree or access to industrial-strength petrochemicals. The following is a list of a safe products which can be easily prepared.

  1. All-purpose cleaner: Mix 2 cups of vinegar and 2 cups of water to create an all-purpose cleaner and disinfectant. Do not use this cleaner on marble. It can be used on both kitchen and bathroom surfaces.
  2. Scouring cleaner: Mix ¾ cup of baking soda and ¼ cup of water to create a paste for cleaning sinks, tubs, toilet, ceramic, aluminum, chrome, and stainless steel. This same paste can be used to polish silverware. Alternatively, mix ¼ cup of baking soda, 1 tablespoon of liquid detergent and enough white vinegar to make a creamy texture. You can also add a squeeze of lemon into the paste for a fresh and clean smell.
  3. Drain cleaner: Pour ¼ cup of baking soda in one cup of vinegar down drains.      The combination of the two will create a fizzy cleaner that will scour inside of your drain pipes. Rinse with hot water.
  4. Dishwasher cleaner: Pour ½ cup of vinegar into the reservoir of your dishwasher and run an empty cycle to disinfect and cleaning the interior of your dishwasher.
  5. Mold and mildew cleaner: Spray vinegar on shower walls and curtains to clean and prevent mold and mildew. Wait 15 minutes, rinse and let dry thoroughly.
  6. Window cleaner: Mix together one cup of water, one cup of rubbing alcohol and 1 tablespoon of vinegar. This cleanser works great at cleaning glass without leaving streaks or residue.
  7. Garbage disposal cleaner: Grind peels from oranges, lemons and limes in the garbage disposal with a handful of ice. The ice will sharpen the disposal blades while the citrus peels cleans and freshen the air.

So, while we’re all at home right now twiddling our thumbs for the next clean out project, make sure you are using the best cleaning product for your allergy and asthma needs. If you can’t find what you need, hopefully this list of DIY cleaners is helpful. But if you have suspected or confirmed COVID-19, please see the CDC’s cleaning instructions.

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Man on park bench blowing nose.

Flu, coronavirus & allergies: Do you know the different symptoms?

Coronavirus (COVID-19) has very similar symptoms to the flu, like fever and cough. But, patients with the flu often experience additional symptoms like a runny nose, nasal congestion, sore throat, headaches, muscle/body aches and fatigue (overall tiredness). With allergies, on the other hand, you will NOT have a fever. But, allergies can cause a runny nose, nasal congestion, sinus pressure, sneezing, post-nasal drip, itchy/watery eyes and worsening cough/wheeze for those with asthma.

Symptoms of Coronavirus

The primary symptoms of Coronavirus include fever (100.4 or higher), cough and shortness of breath. Patients usually begin experiencing fever and cough first, then several days later develop an acute or rapid onset of shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. There has been very little wheezing, nasal congestion, runny nose or sinus pressure reported. Symptoms occur within 2-14 days after exposure to this virus. Coronavirus can be transmitted within six feet of infected patients through their cough or sneeze. Patients who are at particularly high risk for severe Coronavirus symptoms are the elderly population and those with a weakened immune system.

How to avoid the Coronavirus

Ways to help decrease the spread of Coronavirus include good hand hygiene, avoiding those who are sick, wearing masks and gloves while in a large crowd, refraining from handshakes and hugs and limiting travel as much as possible. Good hand hygiene includes washing hands for at least 20 seconds with warm soap and water or using waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizer. 

Most patients have fairly mild symptoms and only need a lot of rest, fluids and over the counter medications. But, those who develop more concerning symptoms like shortness of breath and difficulty breathing require treatment. 

Here’s a comprehensive look at the symptoms you need to look for:

If you are experiencing fever and cough or shortness of breath, please either call our clinic or utilize the Roper or MUSC Coronavirus telehealth screening resources.

For revolving information on the Coronavirus/COVID-19, please follow the CDC here

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Girl putting lotion on her arm

What is causing hives?

Hives (or urticaria) are often described as red, raised, itchy bumps or “welts” that move around and can occur anywhere on the body. Typically, individual bumps do not last for long periods of time, and once they go away, they usually leave behind normal skin with no bruising or scarring. 

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Family blowing their noses while in bed

Winter Allergies Have You Down?

Winter allergy symptoms are the same symptoms that patients experience during other parts of the year. People often experience nasal congestion or stuffy nose, runny nose, itchy nose, sinus pressure, sneezing, postnasal drainage down the back of their throats, and itchy or watery eyes. Although there are not many grasses, trees, or weeds pollinating during the winter, there are plenty of other airborne allergens that can cause symptoms during the winter months. These primarily include indoor allergens that are present throughout the year, such as pet dander, dust mites, cockroach, and mouse. No matter how clean we all keep our homes and workspaces, environmental allergens are still present and can result in allergy symptoms.

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