All Posts Tagged: Charleston Allergy

The Flu Vaccine: More Important Than Ever

Like clockwork, we hear the warnings every year. When flu season rolls around, everyone is encouraged to get the vaccine to prevent the spread of influenza. There are many reasons why getting the flu vaccine is beneficial and highly recommended. What are some of those reasons and, more importantly, why is it more vital than ever that you get your flu shot during the COVID-19 pandemic?

The Usual Benefits of the Flu Vaccine  

The most obvious benefit of flu vaccination is that it can keep you from coming down with the flu. While 100% protection is not guaranteed, getting vaccinated does make a difference

In fact, during 2018-2019, it was estimated to have prevented more than 4 million flu illnesses, more than 2 million flu-related medical visits, tens of thousands of hospital visits and 40,000-60,000 deaths. It may have even been you who was spared from the flu and its potential complications as a result of vaccination (on your part or that of others)! 

What other compelling reasons are there to get your flu shot yearly? Besides reducing your risk of getting sick and reducing hospitalizations, the vaccine has been shown to:

  • Prevent and limit the severity of influenza illnesses in people with chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk for complications
  • Protect women during and after pregnancy, as well as protecting their newborn child(ren)
  • Reduce the severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get the flu anyway. Since every flu season and every individual’s response to influenza are different, you’ll want to have the most protection possible against things going south

Don’t forget that, even if you’re not pregnant or dealing with chronic illness, your flu shot can protect others around you who are. This is especially true during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How Flu Shots Can Save Lives During COVID-19 

Experts have predicted that the viruses responsible for the flu and COVID-19 will be co-circulating this fall and winter. This has the potential to cause several problems. 

  1. It could perpetuate the spread of COVID through individuals who mistake symptoms as mild flu and do not adhere to the recommended guidelines for the sick
  2. Contracting the flu and coronavirus at the same time comes with an increased risk of serious and even life-threatening illness
  3. Severe but preventable cases of the flu requiring hospitalization take away the staff and resources needed to treat COVID-19 patients

Protect Yourself, Protect Others 

As you can see, the flu vaccination is more important than ever before. While in 2018-2019, less than half of all Americans got the flu shot, we hope that many more will do their part to protect themselves and others this year, especially since the stakes have been raised by the pandemic. 

With fall already upon us and flu season looming, now is the time to get your flu shot. Since the vaccine takes about two weeks to trigger the creation of antibodies, the sooner, the better! 

 

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Calm Fall Allergies & Enjoy Every Second of the Season

There’s nothing quite like Charleston in the fall. In contrast to the hot and humid summer, most of us welcome the perfect balance of sun and comfortable temperatures, which make it an ideal time to enjoy the great outdoors.

However, this beautiful season isn’t completely free of downsides. Charleston is notorious for bringing on fierce fall allergies of all sorts. What are some allergens that are especially prevalent here in the fall? More importantly, how can you manage them effectively so that you can still enjoy the season to the max?

Allergens Common in the Fall

Along with year-round allergies that are found here in the Lowcountry, many are also affected by some allergies that are more prominent in the fall. Some of the most common culprits for seasonal allergies this time of year include:

Ragweed. Did you know that each ragweed plant produces 1 billion pollen grains that can travel hundreds of miles? Although not as obvious as its bright yellow counterparts, this form of pollen is everywhere in fall! An allergy to ragweed pollen can result in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, irritated eyes, a scratchy throat and more.

Alternaria alternata. Or, in simpler terms, mold, is a year-round issue here in the Lowcountry. In the fall, it grows on leaves thanks to the warmth and humidity. These mold spores, which can be easily disturbed, can cause headaches, coughing, fatigue and even skin rashes. And this is just one type of mold; there are many more (both indoors and out) that can produce similar symptoms.

Dust mites. While not limited to the fall season, dust mites love warmth and humidity. As a result, they thrive in late summer and into early fall, leading to sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, sinus pressure and itchy skin.

Pollen food syndrome. Some who have allergies to ragweed and other pollens, like birch trees, may notice they have reactions when eating certain seasonal foods. These can include cucumbers, zucchini, melons, bananas, apples, pumpkins and squash. In this case, the pollen cross pollenates with certain fruits and vegetables which can cause allergic reactions such as an itchy or tingly mouth when consumed. This is not a true food allergy but an allergic response to inhalant allergies.

Treating Fall Allergies Successfully

You shouldn’t have to miss out on enjoying the fall in the Lowcountry simply because you have allergies. There are things you can do to reduce and manage your symptoms. You can:

-  Try over-the-counter medications to combat sneezing, runny nose, throat irritation and other symptoms.

-  Wear masks when performing certain outdoor activities such as raking leaves or other yard chores to protect yourself from pollen and other allergens in the air.

-  Use a dehumidifier to reduce the humidity in your home, which can minimize the prevalence of dust mites.

-  Keep doors and windows closed to prevent mold and pollen spores from entering, along with showering as soon as you get home to reduce the spread of allergens.

-  Pay us a visit so that we can find the cause of your allergies with an allergy test and put together a personalized treatment plan. Such a plan may include avoidance measures, medications or even allergy immunotherapy, which can help you permanently increase your tolerance to allergens.

If you’re a fall allergy sufferer, take action now so that you can enjoy the season while there’s still time!

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Mouth Get Itchy While Eating?

If you suffer from hay fever and you have experienced itchy mouth, palate, or scratchy throat after eating certain raw fruits and vegetables or tree nuts, you may have oral allergy syndrome (also known as pollen-food syndrome).  Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is caused by cross reacting allergens (proteins) found in both pollens and raw fruits, vegetables, and some nuts.  As these food and pollen proteins are very similar in structure, our immune system recognizes them as identical and directs an allergic response against both of them.

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Poor appetite? Not growing? It could be EoE

Eosinophillic Esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder which makes up a set of the eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. This condition is characterized by infiltration of the wall of the esophagus with a type of white blood cell, eosinophil.  EoE can develop at any age and commonly occurs in individuals with a past history of atopic diseases including allergic rhinitis, food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. Presenting symptoms in children usually include abdominal pains, vomiting, disinterest in eating, and failure to thrive. Presenting symptoms in adolescents and adults can include heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and most frequently, food impaction. Symptoms of EoE can be similar to those of gastroesophageal reflux but typically with the EoE, aggressive reflux therapy with proton pump inhibitors is usually ineffective in completely controlling symptoms.

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Sublingual Immunotherapy is Coming to the United States

The FDA has recently approved the first formulations of Sublingual Immunotherapy in the United States.  Currently approved are two different formulations one for grass allergy and one for ragweed.  It is likely that a formulation to treat dust mite allergy will also be approved in a couple of years.  These come in the form of a dissolvable tablet that is placed under the tongue daily.  Similar to allergy shots, sublingual immunotherapy exposes patients to the substances which they are allergic to in a way to decrease their sensitivity over time.

Who would benefit from these Sublingual Immunotherapy Tablets?

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