In The News: Indoor Allergies

When are allergy tests needed?

If you have allergies, you likely know it. Sneezing, sniffling, itchy and watery eyes, the symptoms are sometimes overwhelming. Your immune system controls how your body defends itself and it overreacts to allergens you’ve inhaled, touched or ate. For example, if you’re allergic to dogs, your immune system identifies dog hair or dander as an invader. Your immune system produces antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (or IgE). These antibodies travel to cells that release chemicals, causing an allergic reaction. These reactions can range from annoying sniffles to a life-threatening response called anaphylaxis.  

If you’re experiencing symptoms, but aren’t sure why or what’s causing them, allergy testing may be needed. Symptoms that usually prompt testing include:

  • Respiratory – itchy eyes, nose or throat; nasal congestion, runny nose, watery eyes, chest congestion, cough or wheezing
  • Skin – itchiness or eczema  
  • Abdominal – vomiting or cramping and diarrhea consistently after eating certain foods
  • Severe reactions to stinging insect stings (other than swelling at the site of the sting)
  • Anaphylaxis (pronounced an-a-fi-LAK-sis): a serious allergic reaction that affects many parts of the body at the same time

Allergy tests are the best and safest way to tell exactly what triggers your symptoms. The most common triggers include dust mites, animal dander, mold, pollen, insects, foods, latex and drugs. An allergist/immunologist can perform multiple types of allergy tests.

 

  • Skin tests: This is the most common kind of testing done in the allergist’s office. In this test, a small amount of allergenic liquid is placed on your skin and this area is pricked or scratched. Redness and swelling at a testing site tells us you are allergic to the tested allergen. It is generally not much more bothersome than a bug bite. The results of this test are ready in minutes, so you leave the office knowing what you are allergic to.
  • Intradermal tests: Intradermal tests are more sensitive than prick tests and may be used when prick test results are inconclusive. In this test, a very small amount of the sterile testing liquid will be injected just under the surface of your skin, similar to a TB test. The results are available in minutes.
  • Challenge tests: Challenge tests are sometimes used when a doctor suspects you have a food or drug allergy. In this test, a patient will eat or inhale a very small amount of the possible allergen under the close supervision of a board-certified allergist. The amount is gradually increased over several hours to ensure a full serving or dose can be tolerated. This type of test should only be done by a board-certified allergist with experience treating anaphylaxis. For your safety, do not try this test at home!
  • Blood tests: For this test, blood is drawn and then tested for allergies. This test is more expensive than skin testing and it takes longer to receive your results. Interpretation of this test should be done by a board-certified allergist as a positive result does not necessarily mean the patient is allergic. It is best understood in conjunction with an extensive allergy history and skin test. Unlike skin testing, blood allergy testing can be done when patients are still on oral antihistamines.

 

Many people with untreated symptoms aren’t aware of how much better they will feel once they are properly diagnosed and their symptoms are managed. We are here to help you breathe better, feel better and live better!

Give us a call or request an appointment online to begin your allergy treatment plan with one of our amazing board-certified doctors!

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What are inhalers & how do they work?

Bronchodilators, or most commonly called inhalers, are medications that are breathed through the mouth and into the lungs to help relax muscles that tighten around your airways. The medicine helps open the airway and lets more air move in and out of your lungs and helps you breathe more easily. 

People with asthma use inhalers during an attack when their airways swell and become narrower. These attacks cause the person to cough, wheeze and have trouble breathing. Almost everyone with asthma will use a bronchodilator to help open their airways. Others may use one at some point in their life if diagnosed with a persistent cough, COPD, bronchitis, etc. Different inhalers have different medications, or a combination of drugs, to address different illnesses. 

Different Kinds of Inhalers

There are three basic types of inhalers that deliver medications. The most common is the metered-dose inhaler (or MDI) which uses pressure to push the medication out of the inhaler. Nebulizers use air or oxygen and deliver a mist of the medication through a tube or mask that fits over your nose and mouth. Dry powder inhalers (or DPIs) deliver medication, but they require a strong and fast inhalation.

Short-acting bronchodilators are used as “quick-relief”, “reliever”, or “rescue” inhalers. These bronchodilators open the airways and help stop or relieve acute asthma attacks very quickly. While they’re best known for working on sudden attacks, they’re also great to use before exercise to help stop asthma during your workout. 

While many people use short-acting bronchodilators, the overuse of an inhaler, tablet, or liquid/nebulizer, is a sign of uncontrolled asthma that needs better treatment. If you are using short-acting bronchodilators more than twice a week, call Charleston Allergy & Asthma about improving your asthma control therapy.

Long-acting bronchodilators provide control, not quick relief, of asthma. Your board-certified allergist will prescribe the medication, which is usually taken twice a day along with inhaled steroids for long-term monitoring of symptoms. 

Unlike short-acting inhalers, long-acting inhalers do not work on muscle inflammation directly. Instead, they help the airways relax, allowing more air to pass through.

If you’re struggling with your asthma or think you may be in need of a prescribed inhaler, request an appointment online today.

 

Sources:

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-dictionary/asthma-inhalers

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-dictionary/bronchodialator

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Dr. Carolyn with her dog Cider

Doctors and their Dogs

From their playful personalities and puppy-dog eyes to their joyful tail wags and the gift of putting a smile on faces young and small, it’s hard to deny that dogs truly are man’s (and woman’s) best friend! That certainly goes for our doctors here at Charleston Allergy & Asthma. We have a team full of dog-lovers, including some of our very own board-certified allergists!

We’ve rallied up all of the cute pup pictures, fun facts and some helpful tips on how you can still enjoy your favorite furry companion despite having pet allergies.

Gabriel

Gabriel, or “Gabe” for short, is the sweet Bracco Italiano of Dr. Thomas Harper. He’s been with the Harper family since his “gotcha day” on October 21, 2017. Though he may be a dog, Dr. Harper says, “he runs like a horse. Pounces like a cat. Will stand on hind legs and box you like a kangaroo.” He’s a 75-pound athlete and has mastered lots of tricks!

While the Harper family doesn’t have any pet allergies in their household, we asked Dr. Harper a few questions that our patients could benefit from:

What advice would you give someone who has pet allergies and wants to get a pet?

“When you are pet allergic, you are allergic to a protein that’s in the hair, saliva, dander, etc. There is no such thing as a hypoallergenic pet. You can get pets that shed less, but they are still allergenic. If you want to get a pet, you can keep the pet outdoors, vacuum a lot, or invest in a HEPA filter.”

What about cats?

“Cats have a lot of allergen in their saliva and they groom their fur (which dogs don’t) so then allergen aerosolizes off their hair from grooming. If it’s an outdoor cat and the saliva aerosolizes, it’s no big deal. However, if the cat is in the house or an enclosed space, then the saliva aerosolizes and doesn’t go anywhere and the concentration increases.”

What is your top recommendation for treating pet allergies?

“You can also choose to be desensitized to the animals. Immunotherapy for pet allergies is incredibly successful. I have cared for three veterinarians that have been allergic to cats and dogs. Can you imagine? And they were all cured through immunotherapy.”

Boss

This handsome Boston terrier mix has belonged to Dr. Lindsey Stoltz Steadman for seven years. Full of energy with no pause button to be found, Boss is quite the handful and has plenty of nicknames including “Bossy,” “Bossydoodle” and even “Boo Bear!” You also might be impressed to hear that Boss can clear a 4.5” fence; he’s “like a gazelle.” Dr. Stoltz Steadman also had a pet growing up, a Yorkie named Spanky, who lived to be 17 years old!

When asked about pet allergies, Dr. Stoltz Steadman shared that she is mildly allergic to dogs but is able to control her symptoms with medicine and has likely built up a small tolerance to her allergies from Boss.  We asked her to give us a few tips for pet-lovers who struggle with allergies:

What advice do you have for someone with pet allergies longing for a pet?

“Expose yourself to different breeds, seek an animal out that sheds less. Keep them out of your bedroom, that will give you a short break from the allergens. I would definitely recommend getting started on an immunotherapy treatment prior to getting an animal so your symptoms will be better controlled. These treatments help alleviate your symptoms and often lead to complete relief from pet allergies in many of our patients.”

Indiana

This fluffy pup, known as Indiana or “Indy” belongs to Dr. Meredith Moore. He’s been with the family since December 2013! As a labradoodle, Indy is boisterous and energetic but he’s never met a person or animal that he didn’t fall in love with…except for a cat, that is.

Dr. Moore also shared how her family has dealt with pet allergies in their home:

Are you, or is anyone in your home, allergic to dogs? If so, what do you do?

“Yes, my oldest son is allergic to dogs. We had another dog that was a rescue and had her when Finn was growing up but we were moving so much when I was in the military that the dog went to live with grandparents. During this time, Finn developed his allergies to pets and we were unaware. When we settled, we rescued another dog and Finn had a terrible time with sneezing and wheezing so we were unable to keep that dog.  The family was so sad. We started Finn on allergy shots to try to combat this. After he was on for three years, we entertained the idea of getting another dog. We spent time with a friend’s labradoodle and also went and met a breeder and Finn did fine without any symptoms. Even in a room of 15 dogs! So, that’s how Indy joined our family.

There is no data that supports the term ‘hypoallergenic’ in terms of animals. All animals release allergens via saliva, skin, and urine that can affect people. It’s not uncommon for me to take care of patients who say they can tolerate their own dog but are symptomatic around other people’s dogs. Anecdotally, people claim they develop a ‘tolerance’ to their own animal.”

What advice would you give someone who is allergic to pets?

“It would be beneficial to you to treat the allergy first. If people have an animal already, we want to do whatever we can to have the allergic person and the animal tolerate one another. There are lots of things we can do and immunotherapy (IT) is the most effective. You can modify the home environment, as well, by limiting the animal’s indoor roaming space, effective cleaning and air filters. If you do not have the pet yet, then it’s better to treat with allergy shots before you get an animal and get it home. It’s not uncommon for patients to have mild reactions to animals but once the animal is home, it can be up to six months before your symptoms become intolerable.”

Cider

Dr. Carolyn Word’s pup Cyder is a 6-year-old American field black lab, but don’t let her age fool you, she is still very much a puppy! Cider loves to play fetch and could care less about meeting new dog friends, she just loves to throw her ball around. Dr. Word also shared her love for pets when she was growing up. Her family always had labs as pets and even had some rabbits and a feral cat named Simba!

Dr. Word’s family has also experienced pet allergies:

Are you or is anyone in your home allergic to dogs?

“My husband was allergic but completed allergy shots and he no longer has symptoms. I still remember when we were dating in high school, I would sit and wait with him for 30 minutes after receiving his allergy shots. That’s how we got to know each other.”

What advice do you have for someone who has pet allergies but wants a dog?

“Come visit us! I’ve seen so many patients that have pets, developed symptoms, and we were able to help them gain relief with allergy shots. If a pet licking your face is what will make you happy, we’re here to make that happen for you!”

If you’re longing for a pet but believe you might be suffering from pet allergies, our team of board-certified allergists is here to help. No need to sacrifice your love of your furry friends! Consider getting tested for allergies so that our team can help you with the next steps to find relief. Request an appointment with our team today.

 

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Top 9 Asthma Triggers

Asthma is an inflammatory condition of the airways in your lungs. It effects 8-10% of the population – that’s 24 million Americans! Asthma usually begins in childhood but can occur in adulthood and is the #1 cause of missed school and work. Asthma is triggered by a variety of exposures detailed below.

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Children looking at things in the woods through a microscope

5 Hidden Allergies To Watch Out For

Sometimes allergies can be fairly obvious and occur in response to common exposures, for instance, when pollen covers your car in the springtime, and you can’t stop sneezing!  Other times it can be hard to recognize what is causing an allergic reaction. The cause may be something that you would never relate your symptoms to. We will discuss a few of these less recognized allergies below. 

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Kids in class raising their hands

School Allergens Worsening Asthma?

Asthma is the leading cause of chronic illness in children and the #1 reason children miss school. As a parent, you do your best to monitor what your child breathes in at home, but what about at school? A new study published in JAMA Pediatrics researched nearly 300 children with asthma in the northeastern United States.

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Woman in the cold blowing her nose

Sniffling and Sneezing Your Way Through Winter?

Most people associate allergies with trees, flowers, and warmer weather, but it is not uncommon for allergies to persist through the colder months. As we tend to spend more time indoors during the winter, offending indoor allergens, such as dust, mold, and pet dander can be bothersome. Other irritants may include smoke and cleaning products.

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Back to School: Allergy and Asthma Tips for a Great Year!

1. Spring symptoms are all gone, but they’ll be back

If your child suffered from allergy symptoms in the spring, but has improved over the summer, then the fall might be the perfect time for your child to see a board-certified allergist.  Patients who suffer from mainly tree and grass pollen allergies should consider FDA-approved subcutaneous immunotherapy (allergy shots).  Studies have shown that immunotherapy is very beneficial in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis once patients reach maintenance dosing.  Therefore, starting immunotherapy in the fall gives patient the opportunity to reach maintenance dosing before spring. Also, FDA-approved sublingual (oral) tablets from grass should be started three months before grass season so testing for grass allergy should be performed prior to grass season starting.months before grass season so testing for grass allergy should be performed prior to grass season starting.

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