In The News: Allergies

What is Anaphylaxis and Who is at Risk?

As many as 1 in 50 people are at risk for anaphylaxis which is a severe, rapidly progressive, potentially life threatening allergic reaction.  Anaphylaxis can occur from a variety of substances such as foods, medications, or insect venoms. Signs of anaphylaxis can include hives, swelling, shortness of breath, coughing, dizziness, low blood pressure or passing out.  People are not born allergic to these substances but can become susceptible to developing an allergy after exposure.

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3rd Annual Peanut Free Night – Charleston RiverDogs Baseball

Come join us Tuesday, May 1st at the Joe when we celebrate our 3rd Peanut Free Night with the RiverDogs! We couldn’t be more excited for our annual event! The entire park will be cleaned of any peanut residue so peanut allergic families can come and enjoy America’s favorite past time. This is a big deal for many families who are unable to safely enjoy simple events. It’s scary and overwhelming when your children have a life-threatening allergy and we’re grateful for the RiverDogs for making this fun night possible!

“The RiverDogs will take the opportunity to celebrate cleanliness and friendliness on May 1st with the celebration of the World’s Cleanest Ballpark,” said Assistant General Manager, Ben Abzug. “In association with Charleston Asthma & Allergy on Peanut-Free Night, the RiverDogs will take every extra effort to ensure a spotless ballpark on that night,” Abzug added, “with a top-to-bottom cleaning prior to the game, inning-by-inning cleanings, and fun interactive games with fans to help keep The Joe beautiful!

There will be lots of fun eats and drinks, all peanut free, of course! Plus, fun games and giveaways all night long! Gates open at 6 p.m. with the RiverDogs taking on the Asheville Tourists at 7:05 p.m. Children 3 and under are free. You can purchase tickets for our special peanut free section here and use code nutfree18 for discounted tickets! “We invite everyone to stop by the peanut-free night at the world’s cleanest ballpark on May 1,” said Dr. Jeffrey Dietrich. “Just leave your peanuts at home!”

Use Group Discount Code "nutfree18"

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Think You Might be Allergic to Penicillin?

Have you been avoiding penicillin for years because your parents told you that you reacted to it as a child? Are you worried your child may have a penicillin allergy because of a rash they developed when taking it? Do you require frequent courses of antibiotic and are worried about drug resistance because there are so few antibiotics you can take?

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Allergy Recipe: Eating Apples Make Your Mouth Tingly or Itchy?

Have you ever experienced oral itching or tingling when eating a fresh apple with the peeling on?  However, eating apple sauce of a freshly baked apple pie doesn’t bother you?  Have you wondered if you are allergic to apples? Do you get similar symptoms with other pitted raw fruits like peaches and cherries?  If you’ve answered yes, then you could be suffering from Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS).

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Over the Counter Medicine Charleston Allergy & Asthma

Do Over the Counter Allergy Medications Really Work?

Patients, friends, and acquaintances often ask, “what is the best over-the-counter medication for nasal allergy symptoms?” Adults and children with mild to moderate allergy symptoms are fortunate in that most of the best allergy medications are now available over-the-counter. Over the past several years and in part due to efforts by consumer advocacy groups, safe and effective medications for allergies including long-acting, nonsedating antihistamines and nasal steroid sprays have been made available without prescription. While there are still a few types of allergy medications that require a prescription, these prescription medications are not always superior in efficacy to the over-the-counter medicines.

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PPIs and Asthma

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) Getting Bad Press: Still a Great Medicine for Asthmatics

Asthma is unfortunately a common condition (1 in 13 in U.S. populationand many people who have it also suffer from gastroesophageal refluxa digestive disease in which stomach acid or bile “refluxes” back onto the swallowing tube (esophagus) and ] irritates the lining. Reflux can be a reason for worsening asthma symptoms. What happens is acid comes up ancan spill tiny amounts into the lungs at the level of the larynx (voice box). If someone has twitchy, asthmatic lungs, this tiny bit of gastric acid in the lungs can cause acute asthma. These episodes happen most frequently at night, as we often hear people describe waking up coughing and choking in the middle of the night. 

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What is Food Oral Immunotherapy?

People with food allergies have traditionally been advised that the only option for treatment is to avoid the food and treat any reactions that may occur from accidental exposure. This can be very difficult and anxiety provoking for patients and families, especially as children start attending school, camps and birthday parties.  Many allergists are working hard to find other, more effective, ways to manage food allergies.  One strategy that has shown benefit is food oral immunotherapy, or OIT.  

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2nd Annual Peanut Free Night SOLD OUT!

We got off to a rough start with having to cancel our original date due to some pretty terrible weather back in July. Luckily, our rescheduled night couldn’t have been better weather wise. We had a cool breeze sweeping through the stands as we watched the RiverDogs beat Columbia!

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Female Athlete with Vocal Cord Dysfunction VCD

Vocal Cord Dysfunction – A Very Common and Often Misdiagnosed Condition

Katie is a 16-year-old high school student who is a very good soccer player. She is currently playing on her high school team and a traveling squad of All-Stars. In the last 6 months, Katie has begun having excessive shortness of breath with wheezing while playing soccer. Symptoms are worse when she is playing a match but she also notes similar symptoms during practice. She has had one recent episode which was sufficiently severe and caused her to faint. Katie has seen her family physician and he has suggested that she may have exercise – induced bronchospasm (EIB). She has tried treating with inhaler prior to exercise however this medication has been ineffective and the symptoms continue.

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