All posts by Charleston Allergy and Asthma

Lowcountry nurse shares what it’s like to be a COVID long-hauler

Throughout 2020 and now into our second year of the COVID-19 pandemic, many people might be able to relate when saying the coronavirus “felt close to home.” Whether you have received a positive diagnosis personally or a loved one has been affected by COVID-19, when someone you know has a difficult experience with the virus, it can truly shape perspectives.

Our team is thankful to report that Sarah, a nurse here at Charleston Allergy & Asthma, is now farther along on her road to recovery than she was just a few months ago, but her experience with COVID-19 as a 37-year-old, healthy and active woman is not as uncommon as you would think.

We sat down with Sarah to learn more about her experience as a “long hauler” (the nickname given to those with prolonged cases of COVID-19), and how she fought along the road to recovery from the coronavirus.

When were you first diagnosed with COVID-19 and do you know how you may have contracted it?

I tested positive for COVID-19 on June 28, 2020. I’d recently gone in for a surgical procedure and had to be tested prior to that on June 23. I didn’t go anywhere prior to the surgery or after, so I assume that I contracted COVID during my hospital visit for the procedure. I began having symptoms on June 25.

What initial symptoms did you experience with COVID-19 and how did they progress over time?

  • Day 1: extreme lower back pain, terrible headache.
  • Day 2: sore throat, mild sinus congestion.
  • Day 3: raw and sore throat, severe sinus congestion, loss of taste and smell.
  • Day 7: intense sinus congestion, headaches and fatigue. Still no signs of fever, body aches or chills.
  • Day 10: chest tightness, breathing issues, starting to really decline.
  • 4 weeks: breathing under control, but now experiencing heart issues including heart palpitations and chest pain. Received EKG that came back abnormal and was referred to a cardiologist.
  • Continued experiencing heart-related symptoms including an inconsistent heart rate. (i.e. Heart rate in the 140s while sitting and resting, 180s while standing, feeling short of breath, nearly passing out.)
  • 5 weeks: diagnosed with tachycardia and began treatment for myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscles).
  • Also experienced a range of different symptoms in this time period, including hurting calf muscles, bloating, gas, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation and vomiting. Began to lose my hair in clumps, had extreme fatigue and felt “brain fog” (couldn’t remember words, had forgetful days, etc.) Felt like every nerve in my body was firing off at the same time, causing tremors. Taste and smell had only partially returned, certain foods tasted strange. Gained 30 pounds. Felt like every system in my body was failing.
  • Eventually diagnosed with Dysautonomia; autonomic nervous system was damaged by COVID-19, which controls heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and digestion. Severely deconditioned by the time physical therapy was started and had no muscles in hips or legs.

What specific treatment did you seek in hopes of recovering from COVID-19?

I have seen our wonderful Dr. Moore at Charleston Allergy & Asthma since my initial diagnosis. I also consulted with a pulmonologist, cardiologist, gastroenterologist, neurologist and I have now been in physical therapy twice a week since the end of October. I received a wide variety of tests including chest x-rays,  CT of the chest, EKG, ECHO, Holter monitor, cardiac MRI, endoscopy and colonoscopy. I’ve also been prescribed several medications including antibiotics, daily inhaled steroid, rescue inhaler, oral steroids, beta-blocker, colcrys, countless vitamins, turmeric, probiotics, peppermint oil pills and Pepcid.

Are you still receiving treatment for your COVID-19 symptoms?

I am still in physical therapy and follow up with my cardiologist and primary care provider every other month.

Are you still experiencing any lasting symptoms of COVID-19?

 I still have heart rate issues, extreme fatigue, shortness of breath with exertion, headaches, brain fog and occasional GI issues.

How has COVID-19 affected your everyday life? 

COVID-19 continues to have an extreme affect on my everyday life, even now as I’m many months post-diagnosis. I haven’t been able to work full-time in the office for over seven months. I’m fortunate my work has been so patient, as I have just started to return to the office occasionally, for a few hours at a time so I’m not pushing myself too hard. My work has made it possible for me to do some things from home so I can continue to have income.  I haven’t been able to venture out anywhere, although we all should be staying home as much as possible to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 anyway. But I miss small, simple things, like going to the grocery store, picking up a coffee.

As I’ve started to feel better over time, I have experienced some exciting milestones. One big milestone was finally being able to clean my home on New Year’s Eve, it felt like such a big step after being bed ridden for so long. Who knew you could be so excited to clean your house?!

I’m incredibly grateful that Charleston Allergy & Asthma’s team has supported me throughout this journey. They have been super understanding if I’ve been unable to work or if I have a bad day. The people in my life, friends, family, co-workers, have had the greatest impact on my comfort and healing. There’s a big mental aspect to this disease and my support system has been incredible.

How are you currently seeking encouragement and support throughout your COVID-19 journey?

Early on into my diagnosis, I joined several Facebook support groups. After five weeks of being sick, I shared my story on Facebook and it went viral (pun intended) and was shared over 1,200 times all over the world. People were contacting me from New Zealand, Australia, Africa, Germany and throughout the U.S. I have honestly met people that I now consider friends or my “COVID sisters” as we joke, who are going through the same thing as me. My boyfriend, family and friends have been amazing and have helped me with so much. Plus, I am lucky to work from home right now and have also been able to do some self-care by reading books, binging shows, and even took up paint-by-numbers!

What encouragement do you have for those who have similar cases of COVID-19?

I think the biggest thing for people going through this is being your own biggest advocate. Doctors don’t know what causes these symptoms and you really have to fight for treatment and make sure your providers are listening to you. Most testing comes back normal which is frustrating, yet you have all these things going on in your system that can’t be explained. Also, be patient with the healing process. Early on, I knew that I was going to be in this for the long haul and tried my best to stay positive and not get discouraged when I had setbacks. Your mental attitude and fight toward this is everything.

Don’t underestimate COVID-19. Yes, a lot of people get through this illness, but sadly a lot of people have lost their lives. You truly do not know how your body will react. I was a healthy, active 37-year-old with no health issues and I had my life as I knew it stripped away from me. And, unfortunately, my case is not uncommon. There are thousands of people going through what I am going through and it just really is not talked about widely. We need our story to be heard so that more take notice and help figure out what is going on.

Sarah is still on the road of recovery from COVID-19 and continues to serve as an incredible member of the Charleston Allergy & Asthma team. She recently received her COVID-19 vaccinations along with the rest of the Charleston Allergy & Asthma staff and shares her story to help raise awareness of the potential affects the coronavirus can have on those diagnosed with the virus.

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New Asthma Guidelines Just Announced

The field of science is ever-changing with new discoveries and ideas about life and diseases. Scientific textbooks have become obsolete over past millennia and recently, as frequently as a decade or two! Our ideas about what causes various diseases and appropriate management have changed drastically over the last 500 years. Our team receives official updated recommendations for the treatment of our patients and we are pleased to share that the accredited organizations we look to for guidance have shared the latest recommendations on treatment for patients with asthma. In the last 30 years, we have learned much more about asthma pathophysiology and management as new medications have become available for treatment of asthma. If you’re wondering why these might change overtime, Dr. Harper has shared a bit of perspective…

In the 1970s and 80s, I had the opportunity to train at National Jewish Hospital in Denver, Colorado where the sickest asthmatics in the United States are referred. We managed children and adults from every state in the US. What we observed at that time was the marked disparity in asthma understanding and management by referring physicians and hospitals. For example, some of these patients referred to our hospital for severe asthma didn’t even have asthma! The National Institute of Health (NIH) was also concerned about this disparity in the understanding of asthma diagnosis and management. In 1991, an expert panel was convened by the NIH which included physicians, respiratory therapists, and nurses and they assembled uniform guidelines for assessment and management of asthma.

This organization was designated the National Association for Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP). The document generated by this group was extensive and covered recommendations for asthma evaluation and diagnosis, identification of asthma triggers, assessment of asthma severity, and a stepwise approach to medications for asthma management in children and adults. Simultaneously, the international community also developed guidelines for asthma management (Global Initiative for Asthma or GINA) which are updated yearly. The guidelines from this international group generally parallel American guidelines although there have been some recent differences.

Since 1991, this expert panel has reconvened periodically to update guidelines in an effort to share new ideas about asthma pathophysiology, triggers and new medications available for management with practicing physicians. These updates were published in 1997, 2002 and 2007. Since the last guidelines were released in 2007, our understanding of asthma pathophysiology has greatly changed and a wide variety of new asthma medications have become available. One of the most important new concepts is that asthma appears to be more than one disease with major differences in inflammatory pathways leading to the characteristic twitchy airways and airway obstruction seen in asthma. Depending upon which type of asthma inflammatory pathway is present in an asthmatic, certain therapies may be more or less effective. Monoclonal antibody therapies (medicine that targets the chemicals involved in the inflammatory reactions resulting in airway narrowing) to block these various inflammatory pathways are rapidly evolving and becoming available. In 2021, we have finally obtained a new NAEPP update for asthma management which was just published this past week.

New NAEPP asthma guidelines are similar to previous guidelines, identifying individual asthma triggers, determining the severity of asthma and suggesting a stepwise approach to the management of increasing asthma severity. Here are the new major changes outlined for you:

  1. A major change in the new guidelines is the concept of using a single inhaler containing an inhaled corticosteroid and fast onset but long acting bronchodilator (currently only Symbicort or Dulera) as both controller therapy and rescue therapy. This has not been recommended in previous NAEPP guidelines but has been present in GINA guidelines. This new strategy has been suggested for children over 4 years old, adolescents, and adults. It’s a safer way to use short term higher dose steroids to control an acute flair up for asthma than oral steroids.
  2. It is recommended that measurement of exhaled nitric oxide, which is a marker of eosinophilic driven airway inflammation, can be used to accurately direct specific therapy. Eosinophils are white blood cells that all people have but those with allergies and asthma tend to have higher numbers.
  3. The new guidelines also confirm the benefits of reducing indoor allergens in individuals with allergen sensitivity, particularly to dust mite.
  4. Lastly, allergy extract immunotherapy (allergy shots) has also been confirmed to be of benefit in select individuals with allergy triggers for their asthma.

These new guidelines have just been published and it is not certain when insurance companies will alter their coverage for asthma medications based on these new guidelines. These guidelines will help the board-certified allergists at Charleston Allergy & Asthma determine the most appropriate management strategy and medications for their many asthma patients.

If you’re seeking treatment for your asthma symptoms, request an appointment with one of our board-certified allergists today.

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Is it allergies or a cold?

Are you sniffling, sneezing, wheezing and coughing? You may be wondering if you have a common cold or suffering from allergies. The problem is, it’s not always easy to tell the two apart. The symptoms can be the same, but the treatments, not so much. So let’s take a look at each, see how they differ, and how to treat them.

The Common Cold

A cold is an infection caused by a virus, usually in the upper respiratory tract affecting the nose, throat and/or sinuses. Symptoms may appear less than two days after exposure and include coughing, sore throat, runny nose, sneezing, headache, and possible fever. A cold will usually develop over several days and takes a couple days to clear up.

While there is no vaccine or cure for the cold, there are ways to help prevent it, the most common being hand washing. While antibiotics will not help with a cold, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen can help with discomfort. You also need to stay hydrated and rested. 

Allergies

Allergies are your immune system’s reaction to things like pollen, grass, pet dander and foods like peanuts. An allergic reaction usually triggers symptoms in the nose, lungs, throat, sinuses, ears, and on the skin. In the most serious cases, a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis can occur.

Because allergies and colds have similar symptoms, like sniffles and stuffiness, many people get them confused. But, there are additional symptoms with allergies like red eyes, an itchy rash, shortness of breath, or swelling. But unlike a cold, which develops over time, allergies begin shortly after you’re exposed to what you’re allergic to. When it comes to the duration, allergies will last as long as you’re exposed. More than likely, if you’ve been experiencing symptoms for more than two weeks, it’s allergies.

So, what if you don’t know what you’re allergic to, but you have symptoms? How can you tell a common cold from allergies? Take a look at the list below and decide how many of the symptoms you have. 

    • Clear or watery mucus
    • Itchy skin or watery eyes
    • Unchanging symptoms 
    • Sniffles for more than a week
    • Symptoms only during certain situations

If you’ve been experiencing symptoms like these, all hope is not lost. There are multiple kinds of allergies, and treatments vary for each. Treatments include avoidance, medications and allergy injections. 

If you want relief from your allergies, or to find out what you’re allergic to, schedule an appointment with a board-certified allergist.

Sources:

https://www.aaaai.org/Aaaai/media/MediaLibrary/PDF%20Documents/Libraries/EL-allergies-colds-allergies-sinusitis-patient.pdf

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/allergies

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What are inhalers & how do they work?

Bronchodilators, or most commonly called inhalers, are medications that are breathed through the mouth and into the lungs to help relax muscles that tighten around your airways. The medicine helps open the airway and lets more air move in and out of your lungs and helps you breathe more easily. 

People with asthma use inhalers during an attack when their airways swell and become narrower. These attacks cause the person to cough, wheeze and have trouble breathing. Almost everyone with asthma will use a bronchodilator to help open their airways. Others may use one at some point in their life if diagnosed with a persistent cough, COPD, bronchitis, etc. Different inhalers have different medications, or a combination of drugs, to address different illnesses. 

Different Kinds of Inhalers

There are three basic types of inhalers that deliver medications. The most common is the metered-dose inhaler (or MDI) which uses pressure to push the medication out of the inhaler. Nebulizers use air or oxygen and deliver a mist of the medication through a tube or mask that fits over your nose and mouth. Dry powder inhalers (or DPIs) deliver medication, but they require a strong and fast inhalation.

Short-acting bronchodilators are used as “quick-relief”, “reliever”, or “rescue” inhalers. These bronchodilators open the airways and help stop or relieve acute asthma attacks very quickly. While they’re best known for working on sudden attacks, they’re also great to use before exercise to help stop asthma during your workout. 

While many people use short-acting bronchodilators, the overuse of an inhaler, tablet, or liquid/nebulizer, is a sign of uncontrolled asthma that needs better treatment. If you are using short-acting bronchodilators more than twice a week, call Charleston Allergy & Asthma about improving your asthma control therapy.

Long-acting bronchodilators provide control, not quick relief, of asthma. Your board-certified allergist will prescribe the medication, which is usually taken twice a day along with inhaled steroids for long-term monitoring of symptoms. 

Unlike short-acting inhalers, long-acting inhalers do not work on muscle inflammation directly. Instead, they help the airways relax, allowing more air to pass through.

If you’re struggling with your asthma or think you may be in need of a prescribed inhaler, request an appointment online today.

 

Sources:

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-dictionary/asthma-inhalers

https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-dictionary/bronchodialator

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Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) – A Very Misunderstood Illness

Have you noticed an increased shortness of breath or tightness in your chest when exercising? Do you feel like you’re choking or do you experience wheezing when you take part in strenuous activities? Does your voice feel hoarse after working out? Many of these symptoms are common in patients who are diagnosed with vocal cord dysfunction.

Commonly misdiagnosed as asthma, vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is a function disorder of the vocal folds, which are located in the “voice box.” VCD is characterized by abnormal movement of the cords resulting in respiratory symptoms. Patients with VCD typically experience symptoms during inspiration or when they take a breath in. This is because the vocal cords close at a time when they usually would not. VCD can occasionally cause symptoms during exhalation, but this is less common. VCD poses challenges for both patients and providers as it can mimic and co-exist with asthma. However, an asthma attack is treated very differently than a VCD attack, and misdiagnoses can lead to inappropriate and unnecessary treatments.

The most common symptoms seen in VCD include difficulty with shortness of breath, throat tightness, difficulty swallowing, feeling like something is “stuck” in your throat, choking, gagging, voice changes (hoarseness, raspiness, loss of voice) and wheezing. The “wheezing” that occurs with VCD is a high-pitched wheeze-like sound that comes from the throat, not the lungs, as seen in asthma.

There are several possible causes of VCD, some of which result in irritation of the vocal cords, leading to the abnormal movements. Underlying issues or coexisting conditions are also common with VCD and can sometimes even lead to misdiagnosis. These include heartburn (GERD or reflux), post-nasal drainage from poorly controlled allergies, viral upper respiratory illnesses or colds, depression, anxiety, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic pain syndromes. Exercise and inhaled irritants (strong scents/smells like colognes, perfumes, cleaning agents and fumes) are also very commonly identified triggers.

Direct visualization of the abnormal vocal cord movements via rhinolaryngoscopy (camera scope through the nose and down the back of the throat) is the gold standard for diagnosing VCD. However, if the patient is not actively having a VCD attack with the symptoms listed above, then this scope will be normal at the time, Therefore, normal rhinolaryngoscopy cannot definitely rule out a diagnosis of VCD. A pulmonary function test can help to diagnose VCD as well, but this can also be normal in VCD patients. More likely, your board-certified allergist can diagnose VCD based on symptoms and history. 

The mainstay of VCD treatment involves recognizing triggers, appropriately managing co-existent diseases, and utilizing breathing exercises. If patients have difficulty with these exercises, their allergist may refer them to a speech therapist to help as well. Education for patients on the signs and symptoms of VCD and how they differ from asthma can help to reduce unnecessary emergency department visits, hospitalizations, procedures, breathing treatments and steroids.

Statistics on VCD are really hard to find because of how often it is missed. It is almost always diagnosed as something else at first. Our practice has seen many patients who have been treated for “asthma” for years with inhalers and steroids, but all they really needed was vocal cord exercises and maybe some help from speech therapy. 

Treatment by a board-certified allergist for VCD is critical because of how much time, money, energy and unnecessary medications, procedures and emergency department visits/hospitalizations are present on misdiagnosed VCD patients. The treatments for these other issues are not only unnecessary and unhelpful for VCD patients, but they can have side effects of their own. Incorrect treatments for VCD often include inhalers, prednisone or the unnecessary use of EpiPens. Additionally, VCD is seen in a significant amount of the asthma population. VCD attacks and asthma attacks have subtle differences that can be picked up on once patients are better educated. The typical treatments for asthma don’t help with VCD and vice versa.

If you believe you might be experiencing VCD symptoms, scheduling an appointment with a board-certified allergist can lead to a diagnosis and proper treatment so that you can find relief. Request an appointment with our team today.

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The Flu Vaccine: More Important Than Ever

Like clockwork, we hear the warnings every year. When flu season rolls around, everyone is encouraged to get the vaccine to prevent the spread of influenza. There are many reasons why getting the flu vaccine is beneficial and highly recommended. What are some of those reasons and, more importantly, why is it more vital than ever that you get your flu shot during the COVID-19 pandemic?

The Usual Benefits of the Flu Vaccine  

The most obvious benefit of flu vaccination is that it can keep you from coming down with the flu. While 100% protection is not guaranteed, getting vaccinated does make a difference

In fact, during 2018-2019, it was estimated to have prevented more than 4 million flu illnesses, more than 2 million flu-related medical visits, tens of thousands of hospital visits and 40,000-60,000 deaths. It may have even been you who was spared from the flu and its potential complications as a result of vaccination (on your part or that of others)! 

What other compelling reasons are there to get your flu shot yearly? Besides reducing your risk of getting sick and reducing hospitalizations, the vaccine has been shown to:

  • Prevent and limit the severity of influenza illnesses in people with chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk for complications
  • Protect women during and after pregnancy, as well as protecting their newborn child(ren)
  • Reduce the severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get the flu anyway. Since every flu season and every individual’s response to influenza are different, you’ll want to have the most protection possible against things going south

Don’t forget that, even if you’re not pregnant or dealing with chronic illness, your flu shot can protect others around you who are. This is especially true during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How Flu Shots Can Save Lives During COVID-19 

Experts have predicted that the viruses responsible for the flu and COVID-19 will be co-circulating this fall and winter. This has the potential to cause several problems. 

  1. It could perpetuate the spread of COVID through individuals who mistake symptoms as mild flu and do not adhere to the recommended guidelines for the sick
  2. Contracting the flu and coronavirus at the same time comes with an increased risk of serious and even life-threatening illness
  3. Severe but preventable cases of the flu requiring hospitalization take away the staff and resources needed to treat COVID-19 patients

Protect Yourself, Protect Others 

As you can see, the flu vaccination is more important than ever before. While in 2018-2019, less than half of all Americans got the flu shot, we hope that many more will do their part to protect themselves and others this year, especially since the stakes have been raised by the pandemic. 

With fall already upon us and flu season looming, now is the time to get your flu shot. Since the vaccine takes about two weeks to trigger the creation of antibodies, the sooner, the better! 

 

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Calm Fall Allergies & Enjoy Every Second of the Season

There’s nothing quite like Charleston in the fall. In contrast to the hot and humid summer, most of us welcome the perfect balance of sun and comfortable temperatures, which make it an ideal time to enjoy the great outdoors.

However, this beautiful season isn’t completely free of downsides. Charleston is notorious for bringing on fierce fall allergies of all sorts. What are some allergens that are especially prevalent here in the fall? More importantly, how can you manage them effectively so that you can still enjoy the season to the max?

Allergens Common in the Fall

Along with year-round allergies that are found here in the Lowcountry, many are also affected by some allergies that are more prominent in the fall. Some of the most common culprits for seasonal allergies this time of year include:

Ragweed. Did you know that each ragweed plant produces 1 billion pollen grains that can travel hundreds of miles? Although not as obvious as its bright yellow counterparts, this form of pollen is everywhere in fall! An allergy to ragweed pollen can result in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, irritated eyes, a scratchy throat and more.

Alternaria alternata. Or, in simpler terms, mold, is a year-round issue here in the Lowcountry. In the fall, it grows on leaves thanks to the warmth and humidity. These mold spores, which can be easily disturbed, can cause headaches, coughing, fatigue and even skin rashes. And this is just one type of mold; there are many more (both indoors and out) that can produce similar symptoms.

Dust mites. While not limited to the fall season, dust mites love warmth and humidity. As a result, they thrive in late summer and into early fall, leading to sneezing, itchy and watery eyes, sinus pressure and itchy skin.

Pollen food syndrome. Some who have allergies to ragweed and other pollens, like birch trees, may notice they have reactions when eating certain seasonal foods. These can include cucumbers, zucchini, melons, bananas, apples, pumpkins and squash. In this case, the pollen cross pollenates with certain fruits and vegetables which can cause allergic reactions such as an itchy or tingly mouth when consumed. This is not a true food allergy but an allergic response to inhalant allergies.

Treating Fall Allergies Successfully

You shouldn’t have to miss out on enjoying the fall in the Lowcountry simply because you have allergies. There are things you can do to reduce and manage your symptoms. You can:

-  Try over-the-counter medications to combat sneezing, runny nose, throat irritation and other symptoms.

-  Wear masks when performing certain outdoor activities such as raking leaves or other yard chores to protect yourself from pollen and other allergens in the air.

-  Use a dehumidifier to reduce the humidity in your home, which can minimize the prevalence of dust mites.

-  Keep doors and windows closed to prevent mold and pollen spores from entering, along with showering as soon as you get home to reduce the spread of allergens.

-  Pay us a visit so that we can find the cause of your allergies with an allergy test and put together a personalized treatment plan. Such a plan may include avoidance measures, medications or even allergy immunotherapy, which can help you permanently increase your tolerance to allergens.

If you’re a fall allergy sufferer, take action now so that you can enjoy the season while there’s still time!

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Meet the Girls: Our Charleston Allergy Trio!

Let’s hear it for the girls! Our Charleston Allergy & Asthma team has been blessed with some fantastic board-certified providers who all go above and beyond in giving exceptional care for our patients. For more than 30 years, we’ve been providing relief from allergies and asthma to the people of the Lowcountry.

To celebrate the incredible women in our lives, we’re thrilled to introduce you to our three female providers and share their stories of how they came to lead the way for women in healthcare. Get to know our favorite female allergists below!

Dr. Meredith Moore
Did you want to be a doctor when you were a little girl?
“Yes, I had to have a surgery when I was young and afterward, had to stay in a big ward with no parents. A burn victim was next to me and they would change her dressings. She was so sad and would cry. One night, she was crying and hysterical. All the physicians and nurses had left her, no parents were there and I went over and sat with her and made her feel better. I knew that I wanted people to have a better experience.”

What is your favorite part about being a doctor?
“Hard to answer because there are so many things! It’s the relationships you develop with people. They have allowed you the privilege of sharing their lives with you. It’s an awesome privilege and an amazing experience that someone was able to open themselves up to you and then you help make their lives better.”

What’s it like to balance personal and work life as a doctor?
“Practicing medicine with passion takes a lot out of you, whether you are a man or a woman, mom or not. Universally, it’s difficult if you want to approach medicine as a calling. It’s a very rewarding but demanding profession, no matter who you are.”

Dr. Carolyn Word
Why did you become a doctor?
“Growing up, my grandfather was a general practitioner and when we visited him in his office, I loved seeing how he interacted with patients and how he was able to help them. It seemed like a great way to help people. I always loved math and science, so I did biomedical engineering for undergrad. In the process of that, I realized that though I loved science, I loved working with people more. It’s a great way for me to take my love of science and apply it to patient care, which led me to medicine. I loved my rotation in allergy/immunology and all the ways we can make a difference in our patients’ lives.”

Have you overcome any obstacles as a female in the medical field?
“I think there certainly are stereotypes about women in medicine. There have been times when patients have thought I was a nurse because I was a woman or question my knowledge but more often, they have been grateful. When I was a medical student, I felt more pressure as a woman to work harder, push harder and prove myself to be accepted. I have never felt like that in my practice now and I’m grateful to work in such a wonderful practice.”

What’s your favorite part about your job?
“When I get to see a patient for a follow-up and hear that they are feeling so much better. When a patient has recently started allergy shots and has been coming in for frequent injections for a couple of months, then they share that after years of medicine, they had no idea how they could feel so much better; that’s the best part! Patients who have been struggling with a food allergy and who have passed their food challenge, then seeing their excitement. It’s a great thing to be a part of. And just getting to know my patients in general. We catch up about their lives beyond helping them find relief. We’re building relationships. It’s personal.”

Dr. Lindsey Stoltz Steadman
Why did you want to become a doctor?
“I was always interested in the sciences: biology, anatomy, physiology. On top of that, I enjoy interacting with people and going into a profession that was going to allow me to give back was important to me. I really enjoy teaching. I believe as a physician, my job is to educate our patients, our patients’ families and the community about our field.”

What’s it like to balance personal and work-life in the medical industry?
“My husband is a physician as well, so a major part of our relationship is that we’re very understanding of what the other person is going through. We bounce ideas off of each other and educate each other. There are a lot of sacrifices made when you decide you want to be a doctor and it doesn’t end after graduation of medical school, fellowship, etc. We understand that about each other. I understand when he needs to do a surgery in the middle of the night and he understands when I have to take a call over the weekend. Our training kept us a part in different cities and different states, but we understood what the other person was going through. We may have been a part, but we were together.”

What do you love most about your job?
“Critical thinking. I really enjoy the process of meeting a patient and getting to put the pieces of the puzzle together to help them. I’m grateful that I get to improve people’s quality of life. Nothing is more rewarding than hearing their success stories.”

Is there anything you want to add about being a doctor?
“You can know all the science but if you can’t explain it to your patient then it all goes out of the window. Rapport with your patients is equally as important as understanding the science. Patients need to feel comfortable with their doctor. At the end of the day, you just need to be good at what you do.”

We’re thankful for the incredible team of compassionate and talented providers that we have here at Charleston Allergy & Asthma! If you think you may be suffering from allergy symptoms or if you’re in need of a local board-certified allergist, schedule an appointment with our team today.

 

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FDA Recalls Perrigo Albuterol Sulfate Inhalers

Albuterol sulfate inhalational aerosol manufactured for Perrigo Pharmaceutical Company has been voluntarily recalled. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the recall was due to possible clogging of the inhaler that results in patients not receiving a full dose of medication.

If you have an unexpired albuterol inhaler with the Perrigo logo, please contact the pharmacy you received it from. The pharmacy can advise you on how to get a replacement for the recalled inhaler.

For additional information on the recall, please see the FDA notification here: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-alerts-perrigos-voluntary-albuterol-inhaler-recall

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How COVID-19 Has Impacted Pediatric Wellness Visits

Our whole world has been turned upside down. One year ago, you were enjoying social activities, going to the beach, watching and participating in competitive sports, and visiting your physician if you had a medical problem. Since the beginning of this year, however, we have experienced a global pandemic with a coronavirus that has rapidly spread throughout the world. This phenomenon was fairly unknown to current generations, as the most recent pandemic of this nature occurred with the Spanish flu over 100 years ago. To date, the world has experienced tens of thousands of deaths and crippling, long lasting disease, overflowing hospitals, overwhelming fear and the addition of new terms to our vocabulary such as “social distancing” and “flatten the curve.”

With the onslaught of this international pandemic and no available adequate medical therapy, we have been forced to isolate ourselves and our families until a protective vaccine is developed. There is currently an international race to acquire this vaccine, however, vaccines require intensive safety and efficacy testing on thousands of people. It is likely that a vaccine for COVID-19 will not be available until the end of this calendar year.

One of the unintended consequences of this isolation due to the COVID-19 virus has been the disruption of routine childhood vaccinations. The decrease of administered vaccines is on a scale that hasn’t been  seen since widespread immunization programs began in the 1970s. Vaccine disruption has been caused by several circumstances. Parents are no longer taking children to clinics because of movement restrictions imposed by spread of the coronavirus or fear of risk of exposure to this virus. Health workers who provide vaccinations have also been diverted to help with response to the pandemic. This disruption has caused some 80 million children around the world to be at higher risk for preventable infectious diseases such as diphtheria, whooping cough, measles and polio.

According to the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the Sabin Vaccine Institute, childhood vaccine programs have been disrupted in at least 68 countries due to the COVID pandemic. With the expected continuation of the pandemic, this immense vaccination program is now under threat, risking the resurgence of previously controlled infectious diseases.

A CDC morbidity and mortality weekly report issued in May 2020 examined the pandemic’s effect on childhood vaccines. This report documented substantial decreases in the number of vaccines ordered and administered to children since the United States declared an international emergency in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020.

Routine childhood immunizations remain a vital component of pediatric healthcare, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. Children’s immune systems are still developing from passive immunity acquired through the mother’s placenta in utero. Vaccinations help produce antibodies (active immunity) in those who receive them, allowing the immune system to recognize viruses or bacteria and fight off these diseases or limit the severity of complications if exposed to the actual disease. Immunizations also protect public health through herd immunity, preventing widespread outbreak of highly infectious diseases, particularly measles and whooping cough. Individuals who have not been vaccinated and contract these infectious diseases could spread it to susceptible individuals for up to a week before developing any personal symptoms. Some childhood vaccines that were once believed to lead to lifelong immunity have actually been found to decrease in effectiveness during patients’ late teenage years, particularly for pertussis (whooping cough). Recently, recommendations for adult immunizations have changed to include boosters for diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and measles. The likelihood of catastrophic spread of common infectious diseases, such as whooping cough, drastically increases if a large portion of the adult population is able to contract the virus without realizing it.

The CDC continues to encourage childhood immunizations during the COVID-19 crisis, with recent recommendations for healthcare providers to continue with patient visits during this pandemic. For parents who choose not to immunize their children during the pandemic, there are “catch-up” schedules provided by the CDC so the children won’t need to start over or repeat doses that have already been received. Many childcare centers are also allowing a grace period for childhood immunizations at this time. In order to help reduce the spread of these viruses, the CDC recommends social distancing and separating sick children from well children.

As of yet, there have been no reports of localized outbreaks of common pediatric infectious diseases such as measles, whooping cough or polio. However, these diseases are still present in the community and if immunization levels drop and herd immunity slips below 70%, the potential for outbreaks both internationally and in the U.S. increase. Our team currently urges patients to please make every attempt to maintain routine childhood immunizations for your children during this pandemic. We are also hopeful for a rapid and effective COVID-19 vaccine!

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