In The News: Food Allergy

Mouth Get Itchy When You Eat Certain Foods?

If you suffer from hay fever and you have experienced itchy mouth, palate, or scratchy throat after eating certain raw fruits and vegetables or tree nuts, you may have oral allergy syndrome (also known as pollen-food syndrome).  Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is caused by cross reacting allergens (proteins) found in both pollens and raw fruits, vegetables, and some nuts.  As these food and pollen proteins are very similar in structure, our immune system recognizes them as identical and directs an allergic response against both of them.

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Food Allergy Testing: The Dangers of Improper Testing and Misdiagnosis

Recent research published in the journal Pediatrics indicates that many general pediatricians are ordering the wrong tests to try and diagnose food allergies. This is leading to over diagnosis of food allergies, unnecessary food avoidance and increased health care costs. Given that many patients are currently paying up to $650 for EpiPens, proper diagnosis of food allergy is critical not only for patient lifestyle, but also for controlling costs.

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Dr. Word’s Allergy Friendly Valentine’s Day Cupcakes!

Dairy & Egg-Free Cupcakes

Approximately 2.5% of children suffer from cow’s milk allergy and approximately 1.3% of children suffer from egg allergy, making them the greatest causes of food allergy in children (greater than both peanut and wheat combined). Therefore it is not surprising that as an allergist I frequently have to tell parents of young children that their child has either or both of these allergies. As these diagnoses are often made before a child’s first birthday, parents often ask me “well what about our little one’s first birthday cake?” For years, I have mentioned great online sources for recipes, but never with the confidence of knowing the recipes found online were any good. As a mom who loves to cook and especially bake, I decided it was time to put a few recipes to the test.

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The LEAP study: 18 months later, putting evidence into practice

Nine month old Colton was trying scrambled eggs for the second timecolton-9-2016-compressor.  He had enjoyed eggs the first time he had tried them, but his mother noticed a rash on his face and around his eyes shortly after he begin eating the eggs.  Within minutes, Colton developed swelling of his eyes and began rubbing them.  Did this mean he was allergic to eggs? 

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Safe Trick-or-Treating with Food Allergies

Halloween may be the spookiest holiday of the year, but it can be particularly scary for food allergy patients and their families. Children with food allergies can have reactions to foods by accidental ingestion or contact. Use of hand washing (hand sanitizing does not remove contact allergens), following contact with unknown foods is good practice. Keep in mind, 8 percent of children (1 in 13 in every classroom) under 18 have at least one food allergy.

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We Knocked the Peanuts Out of The Park!

We knocked the peanuts out of the park for one night only and it was a huge success! The Charleston RiverDogs happily agreed to let us host a peanut free night so families of those allergic to peanuts could come out and root for the RiverDogs without fear of anaphylaxis from peanut exposure.

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We’re Knocking Peanuts Out of the Park!

With 1 in 13 children under the age of 18 suffering from food allergies, we are very excited to be a part of the first Peanut Free Night at The Joe. During August 9th’s game there will not be peanuts served or available all night. Tickets are $10 with code: nopeanuts. Enjoy a safe night out watching the RiverDogs beat the Rome Braves.

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Coping with Anaphylaxis

Once you’ve been through anaphylaxis, your mind is spinning. You are anxious, your child is anxious…you start questioning yourself and possibly placing blame. Look at a few ways to help you and your child manage anaphylaxis anxiety.

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“The ‘Other’ Food Allergy”

FPIES is pronounced “Fees” or “F-Pies,” like “apple pies.” It stands for food protein induced enterocolitis. A food allergy where the immune system is involved, it is a non-IGE mediated reaction meaning a delayed reaction. Unlike more common IGE mediated reactions you find with asthma, inhalant and environmental allergies and your more typical food allergies.

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Peanut Oral Immunotherapy, is this the peanut allergy cure?

Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) research studies start with a powdered peanut protein that is consumed in increments in an allergist’s office. After increasing doses are tolerated, then the patient is sent home and must eat a certain amount of peanuts daily. The idea is that patients will ultimately be able to tolerate peanuts without risk of anaphylaxis.

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