All posts by CharlestonAllergy

Peanut Oral Immunotherapy, is this the peanut allergy cure?

Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) research studies start with a powdered peanut protein that is consumed in increments in an allergist’s office. After increasing doses are tolerated, then the patient is sent home and must eat a certain amount of peanuts daily. The idea is that patients will ultimately be able to tolerate peanuts without risk of anaphylaxis.

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Hypoallergenic pets are a myth!

There are many articles on the internet identifying certain breeds of cats and dogs as hypoallergenic. The Portuguese Water Dog, Poodle, Chinese Crested, Devon Rex, and Sphynx are some of the most commonly cited breeds, to name a few. Many families with allergy sufferers may see these breeds as providing a path to pet ownership; however, after bringing the pet home, it may not be as allergy proof as expected. This can be an incredibly emotional and financial disappointment for everyone.

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Kissing with Peanut Allergies

It’s hard enough to think about your teenager dating, but what about the fact that they could kiss someone and have a life threatening allergic reaction? Does your child know that if they are food allergic and they kiss someone who has recently eaten their allergen they could anaphylaxis?

With 11 million Americans food allergic and 3 million of them peanut allergic, food allergy studies are going on every day. Two such studies showed that 5 and 12 percent of reactions surveyed were mostly due to kissing someone just after they’d eaten a food allergen. A recent studied found that eating peanut butter and then waiting 4 hours and eating a non-peanut meal did reduce the peanut allergen in the saliva to undetectable.

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Mammalian Meat Allergy

Have you been waking up in the middle of the night with hives, swelling, vomiting or diarrhea? Were you eating beef, pork or lamb at dinner earlier that night? Do you have a history of itchy reactions to tick or red bug/chigger bites? If you answered yes to those questions, then you might have “Mammalian Meat Allergy.” First described a few years ago in the United States by researchers at the University of Virginia, mammalian meat allergy is a delayed food allergy to mammalian meat products.

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Prevent Peanut Allergies – Start Early!

Landmark study presented at AAAAI Annual Meeting paves way for food allergy prevention.

The first ever published data from the highly anticipated Learning Early About Peanut (LEAP) study offers proof that early introduction of peanuts may offer protection from the development of peanut allergies. The study was led by Professor Gideon Lack at King’s College London.

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Antibiotics and Asthma

Your baby is sick with a cold. The coughing and sniffling has made it difficult for anyone in the house to get a good night’s sleep. Your doctor examines your baby and confirms there is no ear infection and no sign of pneumonia. This is an acute respiratory infection caused by a viral infection that is best treated with rest, fluids, and time. “But Doctor,” you ask, “aren’t you going to prescribe antibiotics?”

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Allergies During the Holiday Season

Sneezing through “the most wonderful time of the year?” Well, there is a very good reason for that, allergy and asthma triggers are everywhere, including your holiday decorations. And as it gets colder, we tend to stay indoors and curl up with a fire, a warm blanket and dust mites. No one wants to miss out on all the holiday cheer, so here are few tips and tricks to get you through the festivities without your nose looking like Rudolf’s.

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Does your child have a poor appetite? Reflux? Not growing? It could be EoE.

Eosinophillic Esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder which makes up a set of the eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. This condition is characterized by infiltration of the wall of the esophagus with a type of white blood cell, eosinophil.  EoE can develop at any age and commonly occurs in individuals with a past history of atopic diseases including allergic rhinitis, food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. Presenting symptoms in children usually include abdominal pains, vomiting, disinterest in eating, and failure to thrive. Presenting symptoms in adolescents and adults can include heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and most frequently, food impaction. Symptoms of EoE can be similar to those of gastroesophageal reflux but typically with the EoE, aggressive reflux therapy with proton pump inhibitors is usually ineffective in completely controlling symptoms.

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